An Evaluation Framework to Assess the Impact of Implementing Best-Practice Guidelines

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156747
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Evaluation Framework to Assess the Impact of Implementing Best-Practice Guidelines
Abstract:
An Evaluation Framework to Assess the Impact of Implementing Best-Practice Guidelines
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 21, 2004
Author:Davies, Barbara L., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Ottawa
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Nancy Edwards, RN, PhD; Maureen Dobbins, RN, PhD; Pat Griffin, RN, PhD; Jenny Ploeg, RN, PhD; Jennifer Skelly, RN, PhD; Barbara Helliwell, BA; Isabelle St Pierre, MScN
Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of an intervention to implement nursing best practice guidelines (BPG’s) on provider, organizational and patient outcomes. To determine factors that influence the implementation of BPG’s Background: Since 1999, The Registered Nurses Association of Ontario, Canada has been developing nursing best practice guidelines (BPG’s). We are reporting results from the recent cluster of guidelines. Topics include: asthma; breast-feeding; delirium/dementia/depression; diabetes; smoking cessation; and venous leg ulcers Methods: Pre and post comparisons at six-months were made using both quantitative surveys (nurses) and qualitative interviews (staff nurses, clinical resource nurse, administrators). Generic measures as well as BPG-specific measures were used. Patient data were collected using chart audits, patient in-hospital interviews and follow-up telephone calls. Population: Overall, 11 health care organizations (hospitals, community heath) with 22 units participated. A proportionate random sample of nurses was selected with response rates of 64% (317/494) for the surveys and 88% (83/94) for interviews. For patient data, all consecutive eligible patients were enrolled for six weeks to a maximum of 50 patients on each unit. Intervention: Clinical resource nurses were employed to implement the guidelines using multiple strategies. Variables: Assessment of own and unit nursing practice; Quality assurance; Policies/Procedures; Familiarity and referrals to community services; and BPG specific patient outcomes Findings: Statistically significant improvements in nursing practice and/or patient outcomes were found across all topics which ranged from minimal at some organizations to substantial at others. The most important facilitating factor was the education session while the most important barrier was the nurse’s lack of time to implement recommendations. Support from the organization and follow-up support to staff on the unit were also important factors. Conclusions: The evaluation framework is promising. Future recommendations include a longer time frame as well as cost-effectiveness analyses.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
21-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Evaluation Framework to Assess the Impact of Implementing Best-Practice Guidelinesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156747-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Evaluation Framework to Assess the Impact of Implementing Best-Practice Guidelines</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 21, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Davies, Barbara L., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Ottawa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bdavies@uottawa.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Nancy Edwards, RN, PhD; Maureen Dobbins, RN, PhD; Pat Griffin, RN, PhD; Jenny Ploeg, RN, PhD; Jennifer Skelly, RN, PhD; Barbara Helliwell, BA; Isabelle St Pierre, MScN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of an intervention to implement nursing best practice guidelines (BPG’s) on provider, organizational and patient outcomes. To determine factors that influence the implementation of BPG’s Background: Since 1999, The Registered Nurses Association of Ontario, Canada has been developing nursing best practice guidelines (BPG’s). We are reporting results from the recent cluster of guidelines. Topics include: asthma; breast-feeding; delirium/dementia/depression; diabetes; smoking cessation; and venous leg ulcers Methods: Pre and post comparisons at six-months were made using both quantitative surveys (nurses) and qualitative interviews (staff nurses, clinical resource nurse, administrators). Generic measures as well as BPG-specific measures were used. Patient data were collected using chart audits, patient in-hospital interviews and follow-up telephone calls. Population: Overall, 11 health care organizations (hospitals, community heath) with 22 units participated. A proportionate random sample of nurses was selected with response rates of 64% (317/494) for the surveys and 88% (83/94) for interviews. For patient data, all consecutive eligible patients were enrolled for six weeks to a maximum of 50 patients on each unit. Intervention: Clinical resource nurses were employed to implement the guidelines using multiple strategies. Variables: Assessment of own and unit nursing practice; Quality assurance; Policies/Procedures; Familiarity and referrals to community services; and BPG specific patient outcomes Findings: Statistically significant improvements in nursing practice and/or patient outcomes were found across all topics which ranged from minimal at some organizations to substantial at others. The most important facilitating factor was the education session while the most important barrier was the nurse’s lack of time to implement recommendations. Support from the organization and follow-up support to staff on the unit were also important factors. Conclusions: The evaluation framework is promising. Future recommendations include a longer time frame as well as cost-effectiveness analyses.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:05:43Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-21en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:05:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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