2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156752
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Strategies for Promoting Kangaroo Holding in the NICU
Abstract:
Strategies for Promoting Kangaroo Holding in the NICU
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 21, 2004
Author:Johnson, Amy Nagorski, RNC, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Delaware
Title:Assistant Professor of Nursing
Kangaroo holding of premature infants as an intervention to promote maternal-infant closeness is inconsistently adopted into practice by individual nurses. This study examines the factors nurses rely on as determinants for implementing kangaroo holding as an intervention to promote maternal-infant closeness in the ICU environment. A sample of 84 experienced registered nurses participated in a survey at a 70-bed tertiary care unit. The purpose of the survey was to identify differences of factors such as educational preparation and clinical experience of the sample, and name factors nurses use in determining implementation of kangaroo holding. Of the 67 nurses returning surveys (79.8%), 24 nurses volunteered for a follow-up interview. These nurses were interviewed and data was analyzed using triangulation. The sample of nurses ranged in age from 24 to 62 years old. The majority of the nurses (68%) held Bachelor of Science degrees in nursing while the mean years of clinical practice in the SCN were 10.8 years. When comparing the demographic data to the interviews, nurses with five or more years of SCN clinical practice (64%) were more likely to implement kangaroo holding as an intervention for any gestational age neonate. While the primary factor for implementing kangaroo holding was the assessed physiologic stability of the infant, strategies identified as integral components to promote the use of kangaroo holding as a routine in the intensive care nursery environment included adequate staffing patterns, maternal readiness, and control of negative environmental elements such as noise and lighting. In addition, the majority of nurses (78%) identified management support such as protocols of care and educational programs as integral components for consistent implementation. Results of this study benefit nurses by naming strategies to promote the implementation of kangaroo holding as a routine practice in the intensive care nursery environment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
21-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStrategies for Promoting Kangaroo Holding in the NICUen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156752-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Strategies for Promoting Kangaroo Holding in the NICU</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 21, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Johnson, Amy Nagorski, RNC, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Delaware</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Ajohnson@udel.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Kangaroo holding of premature infants as an intervention to promote maternal-infant closeness is inconsistently adopted into practice by individual nurses. This study examines the factors nurses rely on as determinants for implementing kangaroo holding as an intervention to promote maternal-infant closeness in the ICU environment. A sample of 84 experienced registered nurses participated in a survey at a 70-bed tertiary care unit. The purpose of the survey was to identify differences of factors such as educational preparation and clinical experience of the sample, and name factors nurses use in determining implementation of kangaroo holding. Of the 67 nurses returning surveys (79.8%), 24 nurses volunteered for a follow-up interview. These nurses were interviewed and data was analyzed using triangulation. The sample of nurses ranged in age from 24 to 62 years old. The majority of the nurses (68%) held Bachelor of Science degrees in nursing while the mean years of clinical practice in the SCN were 10.8 years. When comparing the demographic data to the interviews, nurses with five or more years of SCN clinical practice (64%) were more likely to implement kangaroo holding as an intervention for any gestational age neonate. While the primary factor for implementing kangaroo holding was the assessed physiologic stability of the infant, strategies identified as integral components to promote the use of kangaroo holding as a routine in the intensive care nursery environment included adequate staffing patterns, maternal readiness, and control of negative environmental elements such as noise and lighting. In addition, the majority of nurses (78%) identified management support such as protocols of care and educational programs as integral components for consistent implementation. Results of this study benefit nurses by naming strategies to promote the implementation of kangaroo holding as a routine practice in the intensive care nursery environment.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:06:03Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-21en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:06:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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