Double duty data: Expanding quality assurance evaluation methodologies to answer clinical research questions

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156755
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Double duty data: Expanding quality assurance evaluation methodologies to answer clinical research questions
Abstract:
Double duty data: Expanding quality assurance evaluation methodologies to answer clinical research questions
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Poster, Elizabeth, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas at Arlington
Title:Director Nursing Research and Education
A major challenge facing nursing today is to demonstrate a direct relationship between nursing interventions and desired patient outcomes.



The Johnson Behavioral System Model was used to modify the Nursing Quality Assurance Program, making it possible to generate a data base for patient outcome research. With a conceptual structure in place, the quality assurance methodology was extended to collect data on patient outcomes viewed within a theoretical context rather than as isolated events. Rather than simply viewing patient outcomes as either met or unmet, the nature of psychiatric nursing practice and related outcomes were clarified.



This patient outcome evaluation methodology was developed to be utilized in both the Nursing Department's quality assurance and research programs. The instrument is unique in the following ways: 1) The items that are included are theory driven and the language is reflective of the Johnson Behavioral System Model; 2) The terminology provides consistency and links the problem statement to nursing interventions and patient outcomes, making comparisons across patient populations possible; and 3) It focuses on the appropriateness of theory-based nursing diagnosis, nursing interventions as well as specific patient outcomes.



A retrospective review of four hundred patient records (200 child/adolescent and 200 adult) was conducted using the predicted patient outcome tool. Both validity and reliability of the tool were established prior to the study.



This presentation will present not only the highlights of the findings of the study but also an overview of the patient classification system on which the tool was developed. Criteria for rating patient behaviors and levels of nursing intervention will be applied to eight areas of patient behaviors; the ingestive, eliminative, dependency, affiliative, aggressive/protective, sexual, achievement, and restorative.



Data showed that Predicted Patient Outcomes (PPO) were related to level of psychosocial stressors. Length of stay (LOS) over one month were significantly associated with a greater number of PPO's and Nursing Care Plans (NCP's). The PPO success rate was not associated with LOS. However, it was associated with better nursing documentation of interventions and patient outcomes. Resolution of PPO's was documented significantly less often (P<.0001) with the use of Standard NCP's.



The frequency of NCP's which addressed specific types of patients varied greatly with the Aggressive/Protective (N-348) and Dependency Subsystems (N=241) being the most frequent, and the Ingestive (N=42) and Sexual Subsystems (N=4) being the least frequent.



The extension of quality assurance methodologies to encompass patient outcome research has enabled this institution to develop an extensive data base in a cost-effective way. The availability of this data base to clinicians and researchers facilitates on-going program evaluation and the enhancement of an organized institutional clinical research program. The methods presented in this session can be applied to a variety of settings whose goal it is to conduct cost-effective outcome research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDouble duty data: Expanding quality assurance evaluation methodologies to answer clinical research questionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156755-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Double duty data: Expanding quality assurance evaluation methodologies to answer clinical research questions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Poster, Elizabeth, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas at Arlington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director Nursing Research and Education</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Poster@uta.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A major challenge facing nursing today is to demonstrate a direct relationship between nursing interventions and desired patient outcomes.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The Johnson Behavioral System Model was used to modify the Nursing Quality Assurance Program, making it possible to generate a data base for patient outcome research. With a conceptual structure in place, the quality assurance methodology was extended to collect data on patient outcomes viewed within a theoretical context rather than as isolated events. Rather than simply viewing patient outcomes as either met or unmet, the nature of psychiatric nursing practice and related outcomes were clarified.<br/><br/><br/><br/>This patient outcome evaluation methodology was developed to be utilized in both the Nursing Department's quality assurance and research programs. The instrument is unique in the following ways: 1) The items that are included are theory driven and the language is reflective of the Johnson Behavioral System Model; 2) The terminology provides consistency and links the problem statement to nursing interventions and patient outcomes, making comparisons across patient populations possible; and 3) It focuses on the appropriateness of theory-based nursing diagnosis, nursing interventions as well as specific patient outcomes.<br/><br/><br/><br/>A retrospective review of four hundred patient records (200 child/adolescent and 200 adult) was conducted using the predicted patient outcome tool. Both validity and reliability of the tool were established prior to the study.<br/><br/><br/><br/>This presentation will present not only the highlights of the findings of the study but also an overview of the patient classification system on which the tool was developed. Criteria for rating patient behaviors and levels of nursing intervention will be applied to eight areas of patient behaviors; the ingestive, eliminative, dependency, affiliative, aggressive/protective, sexual, achievement, and restorative.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Data showed that Predicted Patient Outcomes (PPO) were related to level of psychosocial stressors. Length of stay (LOS) over one month were significantly associated with a greater number of PPO's and Nursing Care Plans (NCP's). The PPO success rate was not associated with LOS. However, it was associated with better nursing documentation of interventions and patient outcomes. Resolution of PPO's was documented significantly less often (P&lt;.0001) with the use of Standard NCP's.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The frequency of NCP's which addressed specific types of patients varied greatly with the Aggressive/Protective (N-348) and Dependency Subsystems (N=241) being the most frequent, and the Ingestive (N=42) and Sexual Subsystems (N=4) being the least frequent.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The extension of quality assurance methodologies to encompass patient outcome research has enabled this institution to develop an extensive data base in a cost-effective way. The availability of this data base to clinicians and researchers facilitates on-going program evaluation and the enhancement of an organized institutional clinical research program. The methods presented in this session can be applied to a variety of settings whose goal it is to conduct cost-effective outcome research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:06:17Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:06:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.