2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156756
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maintenance of alcohol-free lifestyles: Nursing research directions
Abstract:
Maintenance of alcohol-free lifestyles: Nursing research directions
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Hoffman, Agnes, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Associate Professor
The Specific Aims were to: 1) Describe the experiences and coping processes of individuals over time as they established alcohol free lifestyles following inpatient treatment for alcohol dependence, and 2) Propose a theoretical extension of the Prochaska and DiClemente change process model of addictive behavior.



Rationale: The maintenance of an alcohol free lifestyle following the cessation of drinking is a major challenge for most alcohol dependent persons--relapse rates range from 60 to 80 percent. Prochaska and DiClemente (1984) conceptualized addictive behavior as a change process consisting of four progressive phases: precontemplation, contemplation, action, and maintenance -- our major focus.



Method: Two longitudinal prospective studies were conducted sequentially over a three year period. Study 1 assessed the duration and severity of withdrawal symptoms of 101 men and women at baseline, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months posttreatment who maintained alcohol abstinence. Severity was measured by the 25-item Alcohol Dependence Scale (ADS) (–=.92) (Skinner and Horn, 1984). Physiological and behavioral withdrawal-associated changes were assessed using the 36-item Body/Behavioral Experiences (BBE) inventory (Hoffman and Estes, 1987). Construct validity of the BBE was supported by a significant relationship (r=.41 p<.001) between the BBE and the ADS. Internal consistency reliability was –=.88. Study 2 contacted successful abstainers as they completed Study 1. Personal interviews (n=23) were conducted at 12, 18 and 36 months posttreatment.



Results: Three critical periods of change in the maintenance phase were identified for successful abstinence, which facilitated an extension of change theory.



Implications for Nursing: The findings lend support to change as a process and that intrapersonal, interpersonal, and environmental factors (nursing's metaparadigm) act together and contribute to ongoing maintenance. Strategies used by successful abstainers can be learned and therefore shared with others experiencing a similar change process.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaintenance of alcohol-free lifestyles: Nursing research directionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156756-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Maintenance of alcohol-free lifestyles: Nursing research directions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hoffman, Agnes, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The Specific Aims were to: 1) Describe the experiences and coping processes of individuals over time as they established alcohol free lifestyles following inpatient treatment for alcohol dependence, and 2) Propose a theoretical extension of the Prochaska and DiClemente change process model of addictive behavior.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Rationale: The maintenance of an alcohol free lifestyle following the cessation of drinking is a major challenge for most alcohol dependent persons--relapse rates range from 60 to 80 percent. Prochaska and DiClemente (1984) conceptualized addictive behavior as a change process consisting of four progressive phases: precontemplation, contemplation, action, and maintenance -- our major focus.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Method: Two longitudinal prospective studies were conducted sequentially over a three year period. Study 1 assessed the duration and severity of withdrawal symptoms of 101 men and women at baseline, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months posttreatment who maintained alcohol abstinence. Severity was measured by the 25-item Alcohol Dependence Scale (ADS) (&ndash;=.92) (Skinner and Horn, 1984). Physiological and behavioral withdrawal-associated changes were assessed using the 36-item Body/Behavioral Experiences (BBE) inventory (Hoffman and Estes, 1987). Construct validity of the BBE was supported by a significant relationship (r=.41 p&lt;.001) between the BBE and the ADS. Internal consistency reliability was &ndash;=.88. Study 2 contacted successful abstainers as they completed Study 1. Personal interviews (n=23) were conducted at 12, 18 and 36 months posttreatment.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Results: Three critical periods of change in the maintenance phase were identified for successful abstinence, which facilitated an extension of change theory.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Implications for Nursing: The findings lend support to change as a process and that intrapersonal, interpersonal, and environmental factors (nursing's metaparadigm) act together and contribute to ongoing maintenance. Strategies used by successful abstainers can be learned and therefore shared with others experiencing a similar change process.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:06:20Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:06:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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