2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156757
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The ethics of treatment decision making: The elderly's perspective
Abstract:
The ethics of treatment decision making: The elderly's perspective
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Parsons, Mary, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of South Carolina College of Nursing
Title:Professor
A pilot study was implemented to begin to understand the elderly's

perspective of the ethical dimension of treatment decision making

and the potential influence of geographic location. Few research

studies existed and those that did preselected the issue of

investigation (e.g. CPR, use of intensive care, quality of life,

extraordinary/ordinary means). A qualitative, exploratory,

research design was used. Healthy, noninstitutionalized informants

over 65 years of age (rural = 10; urban = 10) were interviewed. A

semi-structured interview guide was followed. Specific

interventions such as resuscitation, ventilators, and feeding tubes

were discussed after eliciting the participant's own major concerns

related to the future use of health care services. Each interview

was audio recorded for concurrent content analysis. Codes were

organized and categorized through an inductive process and three

reliability strategies were applied to establish credibility and

fittingness. Ethnograph (version 3.0) was used to facilitate data

management. Themes included finances, death and dying, functional

status, technology and treatment, and decision making. Few

differences were noted between the two (rural/urban) informant

groups. Limited implications include the following: additional

research to encompass individuals in various other categories (e.g.

acutely ill, chronically ill, caregivers of the incompetent),

education about decision making for the elderly, increased access

to primary health care, documentation of preferences, and financial

support for catastrophic illnesses.



Funding Provided by Sigma Theta Tau International (#45, 1990-1991).



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe ethics of treatment decision making: The elderly's perspectiveen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156757-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The ethics of treatment decision making: The elderly's perspective</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Parsons, Mary, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of South Carolina College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A pilot study was implemented to begin to understand the elderly's<br/><br/>perspective of the ethical dimension of treatment decision making<br/><br/>and the potential influence of geographic location. Few research<br/><br/>studies existed and those that did preselected the issue of<br/><br/>investigation (e.g. CPR, use of intensive care, quality of life,<br/><br/>extraordinary/ordinary means). A qualitative, exploratory,<br/><br/>research design was used. Healthy, noninstitutionalized informants<br/><br/>over 65 years of age (rural = 10; urban = 10) were interviewed. A<br/><br/>semi-structured interview guide was followed. Specific<br/><br/>interventions such as resuscitation, ventilators, and feeding tubes<br/><br/>were discussed after eliciting the participant's own major concerns<br/><br/>related to the future use of health care services. Each interview<br/><br/>was audio recorded for concurrent content analysis. Codes were<br/><br/>organized and categorized through an inductive process and three<br/><br/>reliability strategies were applied to establish credibility and<br/><br/>fittingness. Ethnograph (version 3.0) was used to facilitate data<br/><br/>management. Themes included finances, death and dying, functional<br/><br/>status, technology and treatment, and decision making. Few<br/><br/>differences were noted between the two (rural/urban) informant<br/><br/>groups. Limited implications include the following: additional<br/><br/>research to encompass individuals in various other categories (e.g.<br/><br/>acutely ill, chronically ill, caregivers of the incompetent),<br/><br/>education about decision making for the elderly, increased access<br/><br/>to primary health care, documentation of preferences, and financial<br/><br/>support for catastrophic illnesses.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Funding Provided by Sigma Theta Tau International (#45, 1990-1991).<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:06:24Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:06:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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