The relationships of hardiness, stress, and health-promoting behaviors in undergraduate female nursing students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156758
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The relationships of hardiness, stress, and health-promoting behaviors in undergraduate female nursing students
Abstract:
The relationships of hardiness, stress, and health-promoting behaviors in undergraduate female nursing students
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Nikou, Victoria, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Hunter College
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: This study was conducted to investigate the relationships among total hardiness, stress, and health-promoting behaviors as well as the subscales of each in a population of well individuals who were future health care providers. Since little research has been published on either the relationships of these variables or on the use of the HPLP II an objective was to add to this limited body of knowledge. Design: An exploratory correlational quantitative design was utilized. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The participants were 250, 18 to 50+ year old female, full-time generic baccalaureate nursing students from 38 U.S. colleges and universities, who belonged to the National Student Nurses Association. They were voluntarily solicited while attending the NSNA Convention in April 1996. Data were collected through mail surveys and completed over 6 months. Concept or Variables Studied Together: The theoretical frameworks for this study were Pender’s health-promotion model, Lazarus’ stress adaptation model and Kobasa-Oulette’s hardiness model. Methods: Instrumentation included the Personal Views Survey (PVS), the Student Stress Inventory (SSI), the Health-Promotion Lifestyle Profile II (HPLPII) and a demographic data form. Data analyses included means, medians, and standard deviations for age and instrument scores, Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients, and multiple regression analyses. Findings: The three hypotheses predicted that hardiness was inversely related to stress and positively related to health-promoting behaviors and that stress was negatively related to health-promoting behaviors in this population and were supported at the p<.001 level. The results indicated that these participants had better health-promoting behaviors than previous nursing students and registered nurses. These participants identified the nursing classroom as more stressful than the clinical area as was identified in earlier studies. The multiple regression analysis determined that hardiness alone accounted for 16% of the variance in scores on the HPLP II and SSI. Conclusions: Hardiness was significantly correlated with health-promoting behaviors and inversely correlated with reported perceptions of stress. Stress was significantly correlated with limited health-promoting behaviors. Health-promoting behaviors were better in this particular cohort of female nursing students than in previously reported studies that measured nursing students and registered nurses. Implications: This study fills a gap in the scientific literature on the factors that either facilitate or impede health-promoting behaviors among a well population of future health care providers. Since 79% of the participants indicated that they had been exposed to health-promotion principles in class a practical suggestion is how findings can be incorporated into the nursing curriculum to facilitate increased health-promoting behaviors among the students. Additional significance to nursing include the identification of a stress-resistant personality factor, hardiness, which when present in students may also be viewed as a means of increasing their stress-resistance as professional nurses. Due to the higher perceptions of stress in nursing classrooms, educators need to become more aware of the need for stress-reduction programs and may need to refine their classroom evaluation methods. Since many participants indicated that nursing faculty were good exemplars of health-promoting behaviors, nursing educators need to be continually aware of the fact that they serve as role models for students through their own health promotion behaviors in a multitude of settings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe relationships of hardiness, stress, and health-promoting behaviors in undergraduate female nursing studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156758-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The relationships of hardiness, stress, and health-promoting behaviors in undergraduate female nursing students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Nikou, Victoria, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Hunter College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vnikou@shiva.hunter.cuny.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This study was conducted to investigate the relationships among total hardiness, stress, and health-promoting behaviors as well as the subscales of each in a population of well individuals who were future health care providers. Since little research has been published on either the relationships of these variables or on the use of the HPLP II an objective was to add to this limited body of knowledge. Design: An exploratory correlational quantitative design was utilized. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The participants were 250, 18 to 50+ year old female, full-time generic baccalaureate nursing students from 38 U.S. colleges and universities, who belonged to the National Student Nurses Association. They were voluntarily solicited while attending the NSNA Convention in April 1996. Data were collected through mail surveys and completed over 6 months. Concept or Variables Studied Together: The theoretical frameworks for this study were Pender&rsquo;s health-promotion model, Lazarus&rsquo; stress adaptation model and Kobasa-Oulette&rsquo;s hardiness model. Methods: Instrumentation included the Personal Views Survey (PVS), the Student Stress Inventory (SSI), the Health-Promotion Lifestyle Profile II (HPLPII) and a demographic data form. Data analyses included means, medians, and standard deviations for age and instrument scores, Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients, and multiple regression analyses. Findings: The three hypotheses predicted that hardiness was inversely related to stress and positively related to health-promoting behaviors and that stress was negatively related to health-promoting behaviors in this population and were supported at the p&lt;.001 level. The results indicated that these participants had better health-promoting behaviors than previous nursing students and registered nurses. These participants identified the nursing classroom as more stressful than the clinical area as was identified in earlier studies. The multiple regression analysis determined that hardiness alone accounted for 16% of the variance in scores on the HPLP II and SSI. Conclusions: Hardiness was significantly correlated with health-promoting behaviors and inversely correlated with reported perceptions of stress. Stress was significantly correlated with limited health-promoting behaviors. Health-promoting behaviors were better in this particular cohort of female nursing students than in previously reported studies that measured nursing students and registered nurses. Implications: This study fills a gap in the scientific literature on the factors that either facilitate or impede health-promoting behaviors among a well population of future health care providers. Since 79% of the participants indicated that they had been exposed to health-promotion principles in class a practical suggestion is how findings can be incorporated into the nursing curriculum to facilitate increased health-promoting behaviors among the students. Additional significance to nursing include the identification of a stress-resistant personality factor, hardiness, which when present in students may also be viewed as a means of increasing their stress-resistance as professional nurses. Due to the higher perceptions of stress in nursing classrooms, educators need to become more aware of the need for stress-reduction programs and may need to refine their classroom evaluation methods. Since many participants indicated that nursing faculty were good exemplars of health-promoting behaviors, nursing educators need to be continually aware of the fact that they serve as role models for students through their own health promotion behaviors in a multitude of settings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:06:28Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:06:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.