Effect of a program to increase the cognitive level of questions in clinical post-conference

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156762
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of a program to increase the cognitive level of questions in clinical post-conference
Abstract:
Effect of a program to increase the cognitive level of questions in clinical post-conference
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Wink, Diane, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Central Florida School of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
The use of cognitively high level questions, those classified in Bloom's taxonomy at the application level and above, has been suggested as a teaching strategy which will help students develop critical thinking abilities. This study was designed to determine the effect of a program to teach nursing faculty how to ask cognitively high level questions.



A convenience sample was used. Subjects in the treatment (N=10) and control (N=4) groups were faculty and the students in their clinical laboratory groups from four National League for Nursing accredited undergraduate nursing programs in a southeastern state. Pre- and post-intervention data on the cognitive level of questions asked in clinical post-conferences were collected by way of audiotapes recorded during the Fall semester. Members of the treatment group received an intervention which included an in-service class, feedback on questioning patterns, and a one hour seminar.



Cognitive level of questions was coded using the Teacher Pupil Questioning Inventory. Descriptive statistics were used to compare data on the treatment and control group percentages of cognitively high level questions. The significance of differences between groups was determined with the Mann-Whitney U Test.



Prior to the intervention, faculty in the treatment group asked less cognitively high level questions than control group faculty. This difference was not statistically significant. After faculty in the treatment group participated in the intervention, their percentage of cognitively high level questions was higher than the percentage for the control group. The difference was statistically significant (p (one-tailed) = 0.012).



Prior to the intervention, students in the treatment group asked less cognitively high level questions than control group students. This difference was not statistically significant. After treatment group faculty participated in the intervention, the percentage of cognitively high level questions asked by students in their clinical groups dropped. The difference between percentages of cognitively high level questions asked by students in the treatment and control groups was not statistically significant.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of a program to increase the cognitive level of questions in clinical post-conferenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156762-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of a program to increase the cognitive level of questions in clinical post-conference</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wink, Diane, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Central Florida School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">WINK@PEGASUS.CC.UCF.EDU</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The use of cognitively high level questions, those classified in Bloom's taxonomy at the application level and above, has been suggested as a teaching strategy which will help students develop critical thinking abilities. This study was designed to determine the effect of a program to teach nursing faculty how to ask cognitively high level questions.<br/><br/><br/><br/>A convenience sample was used. Subjects in the treatment (N=10) and control (N=4) groups were faculty and the students in their clinical laboratory groups from four National League for Nursing accredited undergraduate nursing programs in a southeastern state. Pre- and post-intervention data on the cognitive level of questions asked in clinical post-conferences were collected by way of audiotapes recorded during the Fall semester. Members of the treatment group received an intervention which included an in-service class, feedback on questioning patterns, and a one hour seminar.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Cognitive level of questions was coded using the Teacher Pupil Questioning Inventory. Descriptive statistics were used to compare data on the treatment and control group percentages of cognitively high level questions. The significance of differences between groups was determined with the Mann-Whitney U Test.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Prior to the intervention, faculty in the treatment group asked less cognitively high level questions than control group faculty. This difference was not statistically significant. After faculty in the treatment group participated in the intervention, their percentage of cognitively high level questions was higher than the percentage for the control group. The difference was statistically significant (p (one-tailed) = 0.012).<br/><br/><br/><br/>Prior to the intervention, students in the treatment group asked less cognitively high level questions than control group students. This difference was not statistically significant. After treatment group faculty participated in the intervention, the percentage of cognitively high level questions asked by students in their clinical groups dropped. The difference between percentages of cognitively high level questions asked by students in the treatment and control groups was not statistically significant.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:06:43Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:06:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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