2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156773
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceived support and the use of cocaine during pregnancy
Abstract:
Perceived support and the use of cocaine during pregnancy
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Osterman, Robin, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE
P.I. Institution Name:The Christ Hospital School of Nursing
This study explored the differences in levels of perceived support experienced by women who used cocaine during pregnancy versus those who did not. Increased levels of perceived support have been found to decrease the use of alcohol, tobacco, and caffeine during pregnancy. Due to the life threatening consequences of cocaine use on a mother and her unborn infant, it is important to determine what factors influence a woman's use of cocaine during pregnancy. The research question of this study was: Is there a difference between the levels of perceived support experienced by women who use cocaine during pregnancy versus those who do not? Azjen and Fishbein's theory of reasoned action guided this comparative descriptive study. A convenience sample of 22 subjects who used cocaine and 28 subjects who did not use cocaine, tobacco, alcohol, or nonprescription medications during pregnancy were interviewed in perinatal clinics and a treatment program in two metropolitan cities. The Personal Resource Questionnaire - Part 2 was used to measure levels of perceived support. The data were analyzed using an independent t-test. The study found no significant difference in the levels of perceived support between the two groups. Further studies are needed with larger samples to examine the influence of treatment programs, behaviors of significant others, and socioeconomic status on the levels of perceived support experienced by women who use cocaine during pregnancy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceived support and the use of cocaine during pregnancyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156773-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perceived support and the use of cocaine during pregnancy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Osterman, Robin, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The Christ Hospital School of Nursing</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study explored the differences in levels of perceived support experienced by women who used cocaine during pregnancy versus those who did not. Increased levels of perceived support have been found to decrease the use of alcohol, tobacco, and caffeine during pregnancy. Due to the life threatening consequences of cocaine use on a mother and her unborn infant, it is important to determine what factors influence a woman's use of cocaine during pregnancy. The research question of this study was: Is there a difference between the levels of perceived support experienced by women who use cocaine during pregnancy versus those who do not? Azjen and Fishbein's theory of reasoned action guided this comparative descriptive study. A convenience sample of 22 subjects who used cocaine and 28 subjects who did not use cocaine, tobacco, alcohol, or nonprescription medications during pregnancy were interviewed in perinatal clinics and a treatment program in two metropolitan cities. The Personal Resource Questionnaire - Part 2 was used to measure levels of perceived support. The data were analyzed using an independent t-test. The study found no significant difference in the levels of perceived support between the two groups. Further studies are needed with larger samples to examine the influence of treatment programs, behaviors of significant others, and socioeconomic status on the levels of perceived support experienced by women who use cocaine during pregnancy.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:07:24Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:07:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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