Getting back to living life: Older adults' experiences at home after hospitalization

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156774
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Getting back to living life: Older adults' experiences at home after hospitalization
Abstract:
Getting back to living life: Older adults' experiences at home after hospitalization
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Westra, Bonnie, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Clinical Services, Epsilon Systems, Inc.
Title:
The purpose of this study was to develop a theory answering the question, What are the experiences of older adults during the first six weeks at home after discharge from the hospital? A grounded theory study was conducted with a convenience sample of 26 community-dwelling older adults, averaging 78.8 years of age. A semi-structured interview guide was used for data collection. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the constant comparative method of analysis.



The core variable emerging in this study was getting back to living life. Four major categories were indicated as part of the process of getting back to living life: connecting with life, getting well, reestablishing routine activities, and maintaining self-continuity. Subjects connected with life by being home, mentally engaging in the world, and staying in touch with others. Getting well was accomplished by overcoming fatigue and managing illness. Routine activities were reestablished by older adults caring for themselves when possible or modifying activities through using equipment or having assistance from others. Subjects maintained a stable identity consistent with who they had always been by envisioning themselves as competent, integrating changes related to illness into their ongoing identities, and managing future uncertainty. When older adults were able to get back to living life, they expressed satisfaction with their lives overall. Others, whose lives were significantly changed, expressed feelings of depression, loneliness, and uncertainty about the future. Implications for nursing practice, health policy, and future studies were explored.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGetting back to living life: Older adults' experiences at home after hospitalizationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156774-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Getting back to living life: Older adults' experiences at home after hospitalization</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Westra, Bonnie, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Clinical Services, Epsilon Systems, Inc.</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bwestra@carefacts.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to develop a theory answering the question, What are the experiences of older adults during the first six weeks at home after discharge from the hospital? A grounded theory study was conducted with a convenience sample of 26 community-dwelling older adults, averaging 78.8 years of age. A semi-structured interview guide was used for data collection. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the constant comparative method of analysis.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The core variable emerging in this study was getting back to living life. Four major categories were indicated as part of the process of getting back to living life: connecting with life, getting well, reestablishing routine activities, and maintaining self-continuity. Subjects connected with life by being home, mentally engaging in the world, and staying in touch with others. Getting well was accomplished by overcoming fatigue and managing illness. Routine activities were reestablished by older adults caring for themselves when possible or modifying activities through using equipment or having assistance from others. Subjects maintained a stable identity consistent with who they had always been by envisioning themselves as competent, integrating changes related to illness into their ongoing identities, and managing future uncertainty. When older adults were able to get back to living life, they expressed satisfaction with their lives overall. Others, whose lives were significantly changed, expressed feelings of depression, loneliness, and uncertainty about the future. Implications for nursing practice, health policy, and future studies were explored.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:07:28Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:07:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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