2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156775
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hospitalized elders: Attention deficits and acute confusion
Abstract:
Hospitalized elders: Attention deficits and acute confusion
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:McCurren, Cynthia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Louisville
Title:Associate Professor
The focus of this descriptive research was on the phenomenon of acute confusion in hospitalized elders, with emphasis on exploring the importance of attention deficits to the development of acute confusion. The goal of the study was to contribute to the operationalization of the construct of acute confusion and thereby to propose methods for improved clinical detection of the phenomenon.



Systematic assessments were made of 102 elderly hospitalized medical patients (> 64 years) from admission through Day 4 of hospitalization. Subjects were not confused when enrolled in the study in order to observe for the development of confusion during the hospitalization. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) was used to assess for the presence and development of acute confusion; and the nurses clinical perception of the presence of confusion was ascertained. An auditory continuous performance test (CPT) was used to assess vigilance attention; and the Stroop Color-Word Interference Test was used to assess selective attention. The subjects' perception of their mental status was examined.



One-third of the subjects developed confusion within 4 days of hospitalization; 73.5 percent of the confused group were confused within 48 hours. For the confused elders, there was a significant difference on their CPT, Stroop, and MMSE Attention subscale scores compared to the nonconfused subjects; prior to testing confused and after the onset of confusion, the scores of the confused group were lower. Regression analyses revealed that attention scores have definite ability to predict confusion, but more accurate prediction is possible when attention scores are considered along with other cognitive parameters, namely, orientation, recall, copy design, and sentence writing items from the MMSE. On the attention tests, the CPT was the most consistent predictor of confusion. Among the confused group, performance declined significantly between assessment days on the MMSE items for orientation, recall, attention, and sentence writing, and on the CPT. An awareness of an attention disorder was verbalized by the confused subjects considerably more often than disorientation or other cognitive symptoms.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHospitalized elders: Attention deficits and acute confusionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156775-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hospitalized elders: Attention deficits and acute confusion</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McCurren, Cynthia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Louisville</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">camccu01@louisville.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The focus of this descriptive research was on the phenomenon of acute confusion in hospitalized elders, with emphasis on exploring the importance of attention deficits to the development of acute confusion. The goal of the study was to contribute to the operationalization of the construct of acute confusion and thereby to propose methods for improved clinical detection of the phenomenon.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Systematic assessments were made of 102 elderly hospitalized medical patients (&gt; 64 years) from admission through Day 4 of hospitalization. Subjects were not confused when enrolled in the study in order to observe for the development of confusion during the hospitalization. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) was used to assess for the presence and development of acute confusion; and the nurses clinical perception of the presence of confusion was ascertained. An auditory continuous performance test (CPT) was used to assess vigilance attention; and the Stroop Color-Word Interference Test was used to assess selective attention. The subjects' perception of their mental status was examined.<br/><br/><br/><br/>One-third of the subjects developed confusion within 4 days of hospitalization; 73.5 percent of the confused group were confused within 48 hours. For the confused elders, there was a significant difference on their CPT, Stroop, and MMSE Attention subscale scores compared to the nonconfused subjects; prior to testing confused and after the onset of confusion, the scores of the confused group were lower. Regression analyses revealed that attention scores have definite ability to predict confusion, but more accurate prediction is possible when attention scores are considered along with other cognitive parameters, namely, orientation, recall, copy design, and sentence writing items from the MMSE. On the attention tests, the CPT was the most consistent predictor of confusion. Among the confused group, performance declined significantly between assessment days on the MMSE items for orientation, recall, attention, and sentence writing, and on the CPT. An awareness of an attention disorder was verbalized by the confused subjects considerably more often than disorientation or other cognitive symptoms.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:07:31Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:07:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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