2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156778
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of tub bath on axillary temperature in transistional newborn infants
Abstract:
Effect of tub bath on axillary temperature in transistional newborn infants
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Chang, Hui-Ping, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE
P.I. Institution Name:University of Florida, College of Nursing
Title:Research Assistant
Newborn infants in the United States typically stay in the

transitional newborn nursery until they have had their first bath

about 2 to 3 hours postbirth. To prevent heat loss, a sponge bath

is often given under the infrared warmer. Even so, more than 2

degree F (1.0 degree C) is commonly lost and infants must remain

under the warmer, away from their mothers, until their temperature

rises again. Tub baths seem less stressful, but their effect on

infant temperature is unknown.



Twenty transitional newborn infants, who were healthy enough to be

admitted to the normal newborn nursery, were studied to determine

the effect of a tub bath on axillary temperature. Informed

parental consent was obtained. Axillary temperature was measured

with an electronic thermometer (Model 2080A, IVAC, San Diego, CA).

The tub bath was given in a plastic bassinette placed on a

bassinette stand and filled within 2 inches of the top with warm

tap water (approximately 99.6 degree F â37.6 degree CÕ for the

first 11 infants). Baths were usually given in the mothers'

postpartum rooms or rarely in the recovery room or newborn nursery.

Mean postnatal age was 4.4 hours. Measurements were done on three

potentially confounding variables for the last 9 infants: mean

room temperature was 73.5 degree F (23.1 degree C), water

temperature was 100.4 degree F (38.0 degree C), and bath duration

was 5.5 minutes.



Infant, room, and water temperature were recorded just before the

bath. After the bath, infants were immediately wrapped in two

receiving blankets; hugged and patted dry; laid on two dry

receiving blankets; and dressed in an undershirt, cap, and diapers.

Postbath axillary temperature was taken and the infants were placed

prone on their mother's chest and covered with a dry receiving

blanket folded in quarters and their mother's bed blankets. Caps

were changed 15 minutes postbath and temperature was measured again

30 minutes postbath.



Mean temperature was 98.2 degree F (36.8 degree C) prebath and 98.0

degree F (36.7 degree C) postbath. Mean change was -0.2 degree F

(-0.1 degree C) and was not significantly different using a paired

t-test, t(19) = -1.519, p = .1453. In the last six infants, mean

temperature was measured again 30 minutes postbath and was 97.7

degree F (36.5 degree C), within normal range. Water that averaged

100.4 degree F (38.0 degree C) rather than 99.6 degree F (37.6

degree C) was tolerated well by the last nine infants; some even

gained heat in this warmer water. Also noted was that very little

crying occurred during the tub bath.



Infants were only compared to themselves in this research but are

currently being studied with the warmer bath water and a randomized

control group (nursery routine). Conclusion: The virtual absence

of heat loss during tub baths suggests that infants need not be

separated from their mothers and kept in nurseries under infrared

warmers to prevent heat loss during their first bath.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of tub bath on axillary temperature in transistional newborn infantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156778-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of tub bath on axillary temperature in transistional newborn infants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chang, Hui-Ping, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Florida, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Assistant</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Newborn infants in the United States typically stay in the<br/><br/>transitional newborn nursery until they have had their first bath<br/><br/>about 2 to 3 hours postbirth. To prevent heat loss, a sponge bath<br/><br/>is often given under the infrared warmer. Even so, more than 2<br/><br/>degree F (1.0 degree C) is commonly lost and infants must remain<br/><br/>under the warmer, away from their mothers, until their temperature<br/><br/>rises again. Tub baths seem less stressful, but their effect on<br/><br/>infant temperature is unknown.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Twenty transitional newborn infants, who were healthy enough to be<br/><br/>admitted to the normal newborn nursery, were studied to determine<br/><br/>the effect of a tub bath on axillary temperature. Informed<br/><br/>parental consent was obtained. Axillary temperature was measured<br/><br/>with an electronic thermometer (Model 2080A, IVAC, San Diego, CA).<br/><br/>The tub bath was given in a plastic bassinette placed on a<br/><br/>bassinette stand and filled within 2 inches of the top with warm<br/><br/>tap water (approximately 99.6 degree F &acirc;37.6 degree C&Otilde; for the<br/><br/>first 11 infants). Baths were usually given in the mothers'<br/><br/>postpartum rooms or rarely in the recovery room or newborn nursery.<br/><br/>Mean postnatal age was 4.4 hours. Measurements were done on three<br/><br/>potentially confounding variables for the last 9 infants: mean<br/><br/>room temperature was 73.5 degree F (23.1 degree C), water<br/><br/>temperature was 100.4 degree F (38.0 degree C), and bath duration<br/><br/>was 5.5 minutes.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Infant, room, and water temperature were recorded just before the<br/><br/>bath. After the bath, infants were immediately wrapped in two<br/><br/>receiving blankets; hugged and patted dry; laid on two dry<br/><br/>receiving blankets; and dressed in an undershirt, cap, and diapers.<br/><br/>Postbath axillary temperature was taken and the infants were placed<br/><br/>prone on their mother's chest and covered with a dry receiving<br/><br/>blanket folded in quarters and their mother's bed blankets. Caps<br/><br/>were changed 15 minutes postbath and temperature was measured again<br/><br/>30 minutes postbath.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Mean temperature was 98.2 degree F (36.8 degree C) prebath and 98.0<br/><br/>degree F (36.7 degree C) postbath. Mean change was -0.2 degree F<br/><br/>(-0.1 degree C) and was not significantly different using a paired<br/><br/>t-test, t(19) = -1.519, p = .1453. In the last six infants, mean<br/><br/>temperature was measured again 30 minutes postbath and was 97.7<br/><br/>degree F (36.5 degree C), within normal range. Water that averaged<br/><br/>100.4 degree F (38.0 degree C) rather than 99.6 degree F (37.6<br/><br/>degree C) was tolerated well by the last nine infants; some even<br/><br/>gained heat in this warmer water. Also noted was that very little<br/><br/>crying occurred during the tub bath.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Infants were only compared to themselves in this research but are<br/><br/>currently being studied with the warmer bath water and a randomized<br/><br/>control group (nursery routine). Conclusion: The virtual absence<br/><br/>of heat loss during tub baths suggests that infants need not be<br/><br/>separated from their mothers and kept in nurseries under infrared<br/><br/>warmers to prevent heat loss during their first bath.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:07:42Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:07:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.