2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156787
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Contribution of Mary Catherine McAuley to the Founding of Modern Nursing
Abstract:
The Contribution of Mary Catherine McAuley to the Founding of Modern Nursing
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Meehan, Therese
P.I. Institution Name:National University of Ireland
Title:Lecturer
Objective: To examine the nursing ideas and work of 19th century Irish nurse Mary Catherine McAuley from 1803 to 1841 and identify her contribution to the founding of modern nursing in the 1850s. The following questions are addressed: What knowledge and ideas guided her nursing work? What did her nursing work consist of? What did she believe about nursing? How did she conceptualise nursing? How and what did she contribute to the founding of modern nursing? Design: Historical. The theoretical framework used for understanding her ideas and work is the broadly accepted contemporary structure of nursing knowledge consisting of philosophical assumptions and the metaparadigm concepts of person, environment, health, and nursing. Sources: Primary sources include Mary Catherine McAuley's written statements and letters and those of her associates and other contemporary persons. Secondary sources include selected commentaries and historical research on her work and ideas. Methods: Examination and analysis of documentary evidence. Identification of the themes, principles, and concepts which guided and were manifest in her nursing work and laid the foundation for the continuation and development of her work. Findings: Mary Catherine McAuley took a leading role in re-establishing competent nursing service in the English-speaking countries of Northern Europe after the Reformation. She drew clearly upon the ideas and work of recognised European nurse figures from the pre-Reformation period. She established a very effective home and hospital visiting nurse service in Dublin in 1828, which in the 1830s and 1840s was extended to other Irish cities and towns and to the Bermondsey area of London. Although established as a secular endeavour, circumstances of the period required that she and her associates form a religious order of women so that they could preserve and carry on their work, and they became known as the Sisters of Mercy. Her ideas and work imbue nursing philosophical assumptions and concepts with a fundamental spiritual dimension. The principles and concepts which she developed are consistent with those of contemporary nursing but elaborate significantly on the meaning of important concepts such as the therapeutic attitudes and actions of nurses, approaches to physical and emotional care, nursing authority, nursing management, and the importance of patient education. The principles and concepts which she developed were later referred to by her associates as Careful Nursing and were noted to encompass nursing as both an intellectual endeavour and an art. Twenty-three of her associates provided Careful Nursing for British soldiers and others during the Crimean war of 1854-1856. Although their work was highly acclaimed and had a very significant influence on Florence Nightingale, these facts received no formal recognition and were suppressed for political reasons. Conclusions: The nursing ideas and work of Mary Catherine McAuley constitute a clear and professionally vital link between pre-Reformation nursing and modern nursing. She, together with her associates, originally developed the central principles and concepts of modern nursing. Through her work and writing and through the work of her associates, she contributed significantly to the founding of modern nursing. Her work and ideas can be fully described within a secular context which includes a spiritual dimension. It is possible to use her work and ideas to help guide nursing development today and in the future.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Contribution of Mary Catherine McAuley to the Founding of Modern Nursingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156787-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Contribution of Mary Catherine McAuley to the Founding of Modern Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Meehan, Therese</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">National University of Ireland</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Lecturer</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Therese.Meehan@ucd.ie</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To examine the nursing ideas and work of 19th century Irish nurse Mary Catherine McAuley from 1803 to 1841 and identify her contribution to the founding of modern nursing in the 1850s. The following questions are addressed: What knowledge and ideas guided her nursing work? What did her nursing work consist of? What did she believe about nursing? How did she conceptualise nursing? How and what did she contribute to the founding of modern nursing? Design: Historical. The theoretical framework used for understanding her ideas and work is the broadly accepted contemporary structure of nursing knowledge consisting of philosophical assumptions and the metaparadigm concepts of person, environment, health, and nursing. Sources: Primary sources include Mary Catherine McAuley's written statements and letters and those of her associates and other contemporary persons. Secondary sources include selected commentaries and historical research on her work and ideas. Methods: Examination and analysis of documentary evidence. Identification of the themes, principles, and concepts which guided and were manifest in her nursing work and laid the foundation for the continuation and development of her work. Findings: Mary Catherine McAuley took a leading role in re-establishing competent nursing service in the English-speaking countries of Northern Europe after the Reformation. She drew clearly upon the ideas and work of recognised European nurse figures from the pre-Reformation period. She established a very effective home and hospital visiting nurse service in Dublin in 1828, which in the 1830s and 1840s was extended to other Irish cities and towns and to the Bermondsey area of London. Although established as a secular endeavour, circumstances of the period required that she and her associates form a religious order of women so that they could preserve and carry on their work, and they became known as the Sisters of Mercy. Her ideas and work imbue nursing philosophical assumptions and concepts with a fundamental spiritual dimension. The principles and concepts which she developed are consistent with those of contemporary nursing but elaborate significantly on the meaning of important concepts such as the therapeutic attitudes and actions of nurses, approaches to physical and emotional care, nursing authority, nursing management, and the importance of patient education. The principles and concepts which she developed were later referred to by her associates as Careful Nursing and were noted to encompass nursing as both an intellectual endeavour and an art. Twenty-three of her associates provided Careful Nursing for British soldiers and others during the Crimean war of 1854-1856. Although their work was highly acclaimed and had a very significant influence on Florence Nightingale, these facts received no formal recognition and were suppressed for political reasons. Conclusions: The nursing ideas and work of Mary Catherine McAuley constitute a clear and professionally vital link between pre-Reformation nursing and modern nursing. She, together with her associates, originally developed the central principles and concepts of modern nursing. Through her work and writing and through the work of her associates, she contributed significantly to the founding of modern nursing. Her work and ideas can be fully described within a secular context which includes a spiritual dimension. It is possible to use her work and ideas to help guide nursing development today and in the future.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:08:14Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:08:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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