Parenting Discipline and Children's Problem Behaviors and Social Competency in Korean-American Families

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156791
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Parenting Discipline and Children's Problem Behaviors and Social Competency in Korean-American Families
Abstract:
Parenting Discipline and Children's Problem Behaviors and Social Competency in Korean-American Families
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Guo, Yuqing, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:School of Nursing, University of Washington
Title:Doctoral Student
Co-Authors:Eunjung Kim, PhD, RN, CPNP; Chin-Kang Koh, MSN, RN
Context: Previous research found that parenting practices are linked to problem behaviors and social competency. However, there is little study to investigate the relation between the parenting and children?s development in Korean American family. Aims: The goal of this study was to examine the relation between Korean American parenting discipline and children?s problem behaviors and social competency. Methods: The exploratory correlational design was used in this study. Fifty-eight Korean American mothers and twenty fathers of children aged from 3 to 8 participated in this study.  Self-report data were collected with the Parenting Practices Interview, the Eyeberg Child Behavior Inventory, and the Child Social Competence Scale.  Results: The paternal harsh discipline significantly predicted the children?s problem behavior (FD (1, 13) = 10.51, ß = .56, R²D =.30, p < .01). Regarding the specific parenting strategies of children?s misbehaviors, the maternal ?correcting? was positively correlated with the children?s social competence (r = .41, p < .01). The paternal ?spanking? was positively correlated with the children?s problem behaviors (r = .74, p < .001). Regarding the specific parenting strategies of children?s good behaviors, the maternal ?give a hug? was positively correlated to the children?s social competence (r = .27, p < .05). Conclusions: There was different maternal and paternal influence on Korean American children?s development. The paternal harsh discipline was related to problem behaviors while the maternal strategies were related to social competency in Korean American Children. Implications: Clinically, the findings provide suggestion for practitioners that paternal spanking has the strongest association with behavior problems in Korean American children. It may be beneficial for Korean American children?s development if their fathers can learn other alternative strategies in managing children?s misbehaviors. Theoretically, this study indicates a need of developing or using a culturally sensitive instrument to adequately capture the features of Korean American parenting.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParenting Discipline and Children's Problem Behaviors and Social Competency in Korean-American Familiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156791-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Parenting Discipline and Children's Problem Behaviors and Social Competency in Korean-American Families</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Guo, Yuqing, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yg4@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Eunjung Kim, PhD, RN, CPNP; Chin-Kang Koh, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Context: Previous research found that parenting practices are linked to problem behaviors and social competency. However, there is little study to investigate the relation between the parenting and children?s development in Korean American family. Aims: The goal of this study was to examine the relation between Korean American parenting discipline and children?s problem behaviors and social competency. Methods: The exploratory correlational design was used in this study. Fifty-eight Korean American mothers and twenty fathers of children aged from 3 to 8 participated in this study. &nbsp;Self-report data were collected with the Parenting Practices Interview, the Eyeberg Child Behavior Inventory, and the Child Social Competence Scale.&nbsp; Results: The paternal harsh discipline significantly predicted the children?s problem behavior (FD (1, 13) = 10.51, &szlig; = .56, R&sup2;D =.30, p &lt; .01). Regarding the specific parenting strategies of children?s misbehaviors, the maternal ?correcting? was positively correlated with the children?s social competence (r = .41, p &lt; .01). The paternal ?spanking? was positively correlated with the children?s problem behaviors (r = .74, p &lt; .001). Regarding the specific parenting strategies of children?s good behaviors, the maternal ?give a hug? was positively correlated to the children?s social competence (r = .27, p &lt; .05). Conclusions: There was different maternal and paternal influence on Korean American children?s development. The paternal harsh discipline was related to problem behaviors while the maternal strategies were related to social competency in Korean American Children. Implications: Clinically, the findings provide suggestion for practitioners that paternal spanking has the strongest association with behavior problems in Korean American children. It may be beneficial for Korean American children?s development if their fathers can learn other alternative strategies in managing children?s misbehaviors. Theoretically, this study indicates a need of developing or using a culturally sensitive instrument to adequately capture the features of Korean American parenting.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:08:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:08:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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