Comparison of Learner Characteristics, Knowledge Acquisition and Student Satisfaction In Web-based vs. Traditional Graduate Nursing Courses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156799
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of Learner Characteristics, Knowledge Acquisition and Student Satisfaction In Web-based vs. Traditional Graduate Nursing Courses
Abstract:
Comparison of Learner Characteristics, Knowledge Acquisition and Student Satisfaction In Web-based vs. Traditional Graduate Nursing Courses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Harris, Marcelline,
P.I. Institution Name:Mayo Clinic
Title:
Objective: The objectives of this study were to (a) describe differences in learning styles, personality types, and demographic variables between students who self-selected into an asynchronous or classroom-based section of a graduate pathophysiology course taught by a single faculty member, and (b) determine whether differences in these factors were related to acquisition of knowledge of course content and student satisfaction. Design: A pre-post design was used in this study, with subjects serving as their own control. The “Framework for Assessing Outcomes and Practices in Web-based Courses in Nursing” (Billings, 1999) as well as the “Benchmarks for Success in Internet-based Distance Education” (Institute for Higher Education Policy, 2000) provided a conceptual framework that guided this study. Sample: A convenience sample included over 100 graduate nursing students who enrolled in an advanced pathophysiology course offered two different semesters. Concepts or variables studied: Learning styles were assessed using an adaptation of the Barsch Learning Styles Inventory, personality type was determined using the Myers-Briggs Type Inventory, and satisfaction was determined using a Likert-type scale to assess benchmarks for success. Acquisition of knowledge was determined by administering a pretest and posttest to students, with pretest items drawn from the final exam. Methods: Questionnaires were administered the first day of class to both the web-based and traditional classroom sections. Data analyses were completed using descriptive statistics, t-test and chi-square analyses, and both parametric and non-parametric tests of association. Findings: Initial analyses indicate that significant differences were noted in both learning styles and personality type; the classroom group preferred visual (p=.05) and auditory (p=.02) learning styles and demonstrated differences in personality type (p=.05). There were no significant differences in knowledge acquisition, although Web-based students were somewhat less satisfied that traditional classroom students. Conclusions: These findings present new information in relation to learning styles and personality types of students who prefer web-based courses, and confirm anecdotal evidence that preference for Web-based course delivery is not related to demographic characteristics. Implications: Students self-select course delivery based on learning and personality factors. This has important implications for course design and student advising that have not been fully examined. Further research should include considerations of these issues in relation to methods of course delivery.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of Learner Characteristics, Knowledge Acquisition and Student Satisfaction In Web-based vs. Traditional Graduate Nursing Coursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156799-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparison of Learner Characteristics, Knowledge Acquisition and Student Satisfaction In Web-based vs. Traditional Graduate Nursing Courses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Harris, Marcelline, </td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Mayo Clinic</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mharris@winona.msus.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The objectives of this study were to (a) describe differences in learning styles, personality types, and demographic variables between students who self-selected into an asynchronous or classroom-based section of a graduate pathophysiology course taught by a single faculty member, and (b) determine whether differences in these factors were related to acquisition of knowledge of course content and student satisfaction. Design: A pre-post design was used in this study, with subjects serving as their own control. The &ldquo;Framework for Assessing Outcomes and Practices in Web-based Courses in Nursing&rdquo; (Billings, 1999) as well as the &ldquo;Benchmarks for Success in Internet-based Distance Education&rdquo; (Institute for Higher Education Policy, 2000) provided a conceptual framework that guided this study. Sample: A convenience sample included over 100 graduate nursing students who enrolled in an advanced pathophysiology course offered two different semesters. Concepts or variables studied: Learning styles were assessed using an adaptation of the Barsch Learning Styles Inventory, personality type was determined using the Myers-Briggs Type Inventory, and satisfaction was determined using a Likert-type scale to assess benchmarks for success. Acquisition of knowledge was determined by administering a pretest and posttest to students, with pretest items drawn from the final exam. Methods: Questionnaires were administered the first day of class to both the web-based and traditional classroom sections. Data analyses were completed using descriptive statistics, t-test and chi-square analyses, and both parametric and non-parametric tests of association. Findings: Initial analyses indicate that significant differences were noted in both learning styles and personality type; the classroom group preferred visual (p=.05) and auditory (p=.02) learning styles and demonstrated differences in personality type (p=.05). There were no significant differences in knowledge acquisition, although Web-based students were somewhat less satisfied that traditional classroom students. Conclusions: These findings present new information in relation to learning styles and personality types of students who prefer web-based courses, and confirm anecdotal evidence that preference for Web-based course delivery is not related to demographic characteristics. Implications: Students self-select course delivery based on learning and personality factors. This has important implications for course design and student advising that have not been fully examined. Further research should include considerations of these issues in relation to methods of course delivery.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:08:57Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:08:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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