2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156809
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A multi-level, multi-method exploration of the impact of AIDS on the family
Abstract:
A multi-level, multi-method exploration of the impact of AIDS on the family
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Bumbalo, Judith, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Title:Assistant Professor
The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of AIDS on the family by triangulation of data obtained through a multiple-method approach. This study used a battery of standardized instruments to describe (1) family adaptation when faced with a member with AIDS; (2) adjustment in the marital (parental) dyad when faced with an adult child with AIDS; (3) autonomy and relatedness in the relationship between parents and the adult child with AIDS; and (4) the physical and psychological health of individual family members. Face-to-face in-depth interviews and observations were used for purposes of confirmation and completeness. Multiple triangulation of data sources, investigators, and methods provided a more complete picture of the complex phenomena under investigation. A convenience sample of 30 families of origin (i.e., up to 120 individuals) was recruited for Phase I of this study. Parents, siblings, and the family member who has AIDS were included. In Phase II, theoretical sampling was used to represent the three levels of analysis (i.e., families, dyads, and individuals) of the quantitative instruments. Thus, the Phase II subsample consisted of 5 families (i.e., three or more individuals), 5 marital dyads, 5 parent-child dyads, and 20 individual respondents (i.e., 5 fathers, 5 mothers, 5 siblings, and 5 adult children with AIDS). The battery of standardized instruments included the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Scale (FACES III), the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS), the Autonomy and Relatedness Scale (ARI), and the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI). The semi-structured interview schedule reflected the content domains measured by the standardized instruments. The Clinical Rating Scale (CRS) was used as an observational measure. Data analysis consisted of three stages. Stage one focused on estimating reliability of standardized instruments with the unique population of this study as well as intercoder agreement of interview data and interrater reliability of observational data. Stage two involved analysis of data within each method for each unit of analysis (i.e., families, dyads, individuals). Stage three consisted of triangulation of data across methods. More than 50 percent of persons with AIDS die within two years, leaving families to cope with multiple adjustments in a short period of time as well as with the aftermath of the devastating illness. Although there has been considerable attention in recent years to the problems of persons with AIDS as well as their significant others, there has been little systematic study of the impact of AIDS on families of origin. This investigation, which will be completed by October 1991, described multi-level family responses to crises evoked by a family member with AIDS. Results will be used to formulate service recommendations and to provide the foundation for a large-scale program of intervention research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA multi-level, multi-method exploration of the impact of AIDS on the familyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156809-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A multi-level, multi-method exploration of the impact of AIDS on the family</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bumbalo, Judith, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of AIDS on the family by triangulation of data obtained through a multiple-method approach. This study used a battery of standardized instruments to describe (1) family adaptation when faced with a member with AIDS; (2) adjustment in the marital (parental) dyad when faced with an adult child with AIDS; (3) autonomy and relatedness in the relationship between parents and the adult child with AIDS; and (4) the physical and psychological health of individual family members. Face-to-face in-depth interviews and observations were used for purposes of confirmation and completeness. Multiple triangulation of data sources, investigators, and methods provided a more complete picture of the complex phenomena under investigation. A convenience sample of 30 families of origin (i.e., up to 120 individuals) was recruited for Phase I of this study. Parents, siblings, and the family member who has AIDS were included. In Phase II, theoretical sampling was used to represent the three levels of analysis (i.e., families, dyads, and individuals) of the quantitative instruments. Thus, the Phase II subsample consisted of 5 families (i.e., three or more individuals), 5 marital dyads, 5 parent-child dyads, and 20 individual respondents (i.e., 5 fathers, 5 mothers, 5 siblings, and 5 adult children with AIDS). The battery of standardized instruments included the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Scale (FACES III), the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS), the Autonomy and Relatedness Scale (ARI), and the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI). The semi-structured interview schedule reflected the content domains measured by the standardized instruments. The Clinical Rating Scale (CRS) was used as an observational measure. Data analysis consisted of three stages. Stage one focused on estimating reliability of standardized instruments with the unique population of this study as well as intercoder agreement of interview data and interrater reliability of observational data. Stage two involved analysis of data within each method for each unit of analysis (i.e., families, dyads, individuals). Stage three consisted of triangulation of data across methods. More than 50 percent of persons with AIDS die within two years, leaving families to cope with multiple adjustments in a short period of time as well as with the aftermath of the devastating illness. Although there has been considerable attention in recent years to the problems of persons with AIDS as well as their significant others, there has been little systematic study of the impact of AIDS on families of origin. This investigation, which will be completed by October 1991, described multi-level family responses to crises evoked by a family member with AIDS. Results will be used to formulate service recommendations and to provide the foundation for a large-scale program of intervention research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:09:33Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:09:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.