2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156810
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Professional caregiving in the midst of personal risk: Nurses and AIDS
Abstract:
Professional caregiving in the midst of personal risk: Nurses and AIDS
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1993
Conference Date:June 21 - 22, 1993
Author:Reutter, Linda, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Alberta Faculty of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Caring for persons with AIDS (PWAs) presents nurses with unique

challenges that relate to the infectious,

stigmatizing and fatal nature of AIDS. A salient issue for nurses

worldwide is protecting themselves from

occupationally acquired HIV infection while also ensuring that PWAs

receive quality care. Moreover, many

PWAs have acquired AIDS through behaviors that are themselves

stigmatizing. This may influence the nurses'

commitment to caring for PWAs (and accepting the attendant risk)

and the support that nurses receive from

their significant others. While there is considerable research

examining nurses' perceptions of risk, much less

is known about how nurses cope with their perceptions of risk.



This paper is based on a qualitative study that examined how nurses

cope with their concerns about acquiring

HIV infection when caring for person with AIDS (PWAs). Indepth

interviews were conducted with thirteen

nurses who had cared for AIDS patients in a Western Canadian

hospital. The data were analyzed using the

constant comparative methodology of grounded theory.



The analysis revealed that the overall process of coping with risk

involved achieving a sense of control over

uncertainty. Nurses' coping efforts were related to four tasks:

making risk manageable, making risk

meaningful, maintaining professional self-esteem, and responding

to the concerns of significant others. Nurses

make risk manageable by maximizing safety through the use of

precautions, minimizing or normalizing risk, and

diverting attention from situations that tend to elicit fear.



Making risk meaningful refers to nurses' efforts to justify

caring for patients in the face of risk. A sense of

meaning was related to accepting the patient as a person who needs

and deserves empathic care, finding work

enjoyable and worthwhile, and professional commitment to care for

all patients.



A threat to professional self-esteem arises when the nurses'

personal feelings and actions are perceived to be

divergent from professional expectations. Many nurses perceived

that they would be unafraid and accepting of

PWAs yet felt afraid and resentful. Such inappropriate feelings

threaten the nurse's self-image as a caring

professional and give rise to coping strategies that will preserve

a favorable image to themselves, their patients,

and their coworkers.



A final task facing nurses who care for PWAs is responding to the

concerns of the nurses' significant others.

Families fear for the nurses' safety. Moreover, negative attitudes

toward homosexuality and drug abuse may

prevent nurses' families from valuing the nurses' work. To manage

their families' concerns, nurses minimize the

risk involved in caring for PWAs and attempt to convince family

members that their work is valuable to patients

and personally satisfying to themselves.



Insights from this study can be used to design programs that will

provide nurses with knowledgeable and sensitive

support that will facilitate their caregiving. This study suggests

that nurses' concerns must be viewed from a

broad perspective that incorporates not only their professional

milieu but also acknowledges their participation

in a larger social context.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
21-Jun-1993
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProfessional caregiving in the midst of personal risk: Nurses and AIDSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156810-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Professional caregiving in the midst of personal risk: Nurses and AIDS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1993</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June 21 - 22, 1993</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Reutter, Linda, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Alberta Faculty of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Linda.Reutter@UAlberta.CA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Caring for persons with AIDS (PWAs) presents nurses with unique<br/><br/>challenges that relate to the infectious,<br/><br/>stigmatizing and fatal nature of AIDS. A salient issue for nurses<br/><br/>worldwide is protecting themselves from<br/><br/>occupationally acquired HIV infection while also ensuring that PWAs<br/><br/>receive quality care. Moreover, many<br/><br/>PWAs have acquired AIDS through behaviors that are themselves<br/><br/>stigmatizing. This may influence the nurses'<br/><br/>commitment to caring for PWAs (and accepting the attendant risk)<br/><br/>and the support that nurses receive from<br/><br/>their significant others. While there is considerable research<br/><br/>examining nurses' perceptions of risk, much less<br/><br/>is known about how nurses cope with their perceptions of risk.<br/><br/><br/><br/>This paper is based on a qualitative study that examined how nurses<br/><br/>cope with their concerns about acquiring<br/><br/>HIV infection when caring for person with AIDS (PWAs). Indepth<br/><br/>interviews were conducted with thirteen<br/><br/>nurses who had cared for AIDS patients in a Western Canadian<br/><br/>hospital. The data were analyzed using the<br/><br/>constant comparative methodology of grounded theory.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The analysis revealed that the overall process of coping with risk<br/><br/>involved achieving a sense of control over<br/><br/>uncertainty. Nurses' coping efforts were related to four tasks:<br/><br/>making risk manageable, making risk<br/><br/>meaningful, maintaining professional self-esteem, and responding<br/><br/>to the concerns of significant others. Nurses<br/><br/>make risk manageable by maximizing safety through the use of<br/><br/>precautions, minimizing or normalizing risk, and<br/><br/>diverting attention from situations that tend to elicit fear.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Making risk meaningful refers to nurses' efforts to justify<br/><br/>caring for patients in the face of risk. A sense of<br/><br/>meaning was related to accepting the patient as a person who needs<br/><br/>and deserves empathic care, finding work<br/><br/>enjoyable and worthwhile, and professional commitment to care for<br/><br/>all patients.<br/><br/><br/><br/>A threat to professional self-esteem arises when the nurses'<br/><br/>personal feelings and actions are perceived to be<br/><br/>divergent from professional expectations. Many nurses perceived<br/><br/>that they would be unafraid and accepting of<br/><br/>PWAs yet felt afraid and resentful. Such inappropriate feelings<br/><br/>threaten the nurse's self-image as a caring<br/><br/>professional and give rise to coping strategies that will preserve<br/><br/>a favorable image to themselves, their patients,<br/><br/>and their coworkers.<br/><br/><br/><br/>A final task facing nurses who care for PWAs is responding to the<br/><br/>concerns of the nurses' significant others.<br/><br/>Families fear for the nurses' safety. Moreover, negative attitudes<br/><br/>toward homosexuality and drug abuse may<br/><br/>prevent nurses' families from valuing the nurses' work. To manage<br/><br/>their families' concerns, nurses minimize the<br/><br/>risk involved in caring for PWAs and attempt to convince family<br/><br/>members that their work is valuable to patients<br/><br/>and personally satisfying to themselves.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Insights from this study can be used to design programs that will<br/><br/>provide nurses with knowledgeable and sensitive<br/><br/>support that will facilitate their caregiving. This study suggests<br/><br/>that nurses' concerns must be viewed from a<br/><br/>broad perspective that incorporates not only their professional<br/><br/>milieu but also acknowledges their participation<br/><br/>in a larger social context.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:09:37Z-
dc.date.issued1993-06-21en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:09:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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