2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156813
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Dietary fiber and enteral feedings: What happens to insulin levels?
Abstract:
Dietary fiber and enteral feedings: What happens to insulin levels?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1999
Conference Date:June 26, 1999
Author:Westfall, Una, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Oregon Health & Science University
Title:Professor
Objective: A perplexing and incomplete picture has emerged for many aspects of enteral feeding management for which nurses have responsibility. To add to the growing knowledge base nurses use to make enteral nutrition decisions, this study tested for the presence and characteristics of systemic insulin with high- vs. no-fiber, 12 hour [rest-time] enteral feedings delivered by two feeding methods and at two kilocalorie levels.



Design: An experimental 2x2x2 time series design was used with healthy rats.



Sample: Forty Sprague-Dawley male, adult rats were randomly assigned to enteral feeding groups; 20 = hi-fiber and 20 = no-fiber. Hourly blood samples were drawn for a 24-hr period.



Variables: Central to this study was high-(2.4gms/240ml) vs. no-fiber (0.0gms/240ml). Other independent variables were method (infusion vs. bolus) and kilocalorie level (80 vs. 55 kcals).



Methods: All groups participated in a standard 28-day protocol with gastrostomy tubes placed on Day 7 and enteral feedings on Days 18-28, after environmental and feeding acclimation. Each animal donated blood samples the last 2 protocol days to construct a composite animal for each feeding group. Duplicate samples for insulin129I assays had coefficients of variation <3.0%.



Findings: In three of the four hi-fiber groups, the areas under the 24-hour insulin curves were greater by 24 to 29 1uU/ml than in the corresponding no-fiber groups. In contrast, the hour by hour variability was much smaller in the hi-fiber groups (SD=6.7 to 11.9) compared to the no-fiber groups (SD=4.3 to 24.0), with the greatest fluctuations in the no-fiber bolus fed groups (SD=18.8 to 24.0). Below are graphs from two feeding groups alike except for fiber content. Enteral feedings were at 6 am, 10 am, 2 pm (1400 hr), and 6 pm (1800 hr).



Conclusions: By far the greatest hourly differences were found in the no-fiber animal groups that received feedings by intermittent bolus. Generally higher mean insulin levels were found in the hi-fiber groups, although the hour to hour variability was less.



Implications: If vulnerable groups receiving enteral feedings are unable to accommodate with rapid insulin responses to wide fluctuations in blood glucose levels, these findings suggest that some enteral feeding options, such as no-fiber formula delivered over limited time periods, may be detrimental.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Jun-1999
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDietary fiber and enteral feedings: What happens to insulin levels?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156813-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Dietary fiber and enteral feedings: What happens to insulin levels?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1999</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June 26, 1999</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Westfall, Una, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oregon Health &amp; Science University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">westfall@ohsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: A perplexing and incomplete picture has emerged for many aspects of enteral feeding management for which nurses have responsibility. To add to the growing knowledge base nurses use to make enteral nutrition decisions, this study tested for the presence and characteristics of systemic insulin with high- vs. no-fiber, 12 hour [rest-time] enteral feedings delivered by two feeding methods and at two kilocalorie levels.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Design: An experimental 2x2x2 time series design was used with healthy rats.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Sample: Forty Sprague-Dawley male, adult rats were randomly assigned to enteral feeding groups; 20 = hi-fiber and 20 = no-fiber. Hourly blood samples were drawn for a 24-hr period.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Variables: Central to this study was high-(2.4gms/240ml) vs. no-fiber (0.0gms/240ml). Other independent variables were method (infusion vs. bolus) and kilocalorie level (80 vs. 55 kcals).<br/><br/><br/><br/>Methods: All groups participated in a standard 28-day protocol with gastrostomy tubes placed on Day 7 and enteral feedings on Days 18-28, after environmental and feeding acclimation. Each animal donated blood samples the last 2 protocol days to construct a composite animal for each feeding group. Duplicate samples for insulin129I assays had coefficients of variation &lt;3.0%.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Findings: In three of the four hi-fiber groups, the areas under the 24-hour insulin curves were greater by 24 to 29 1uU/ml than in the corresponding no-fiber groups. In contrast, the hour by hour variability was much smaller in the hi-fiber groups (SD=6.7 to 11.9) compared to the no-fiber groups (SD=4.3 to 24.0), with the greatest fluctuations in the no-fiber bolus fed groups (SD=18.8 to 24.0). Below are graphs from two feeding groups alike except for fiber content. Enteral feedings were at 6 am, 10 am, 2 pm (1400 hr), and 6 pm (1800 hr).<br/><br/><br/><br/>Conclusions: By far the greatest hourly differences were found in the no-fiber animal groups that received feedings by intermittent bolus. Generally higher mean insulin levels were found in the hi-fiber groups, although the hour to hour variability was less.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Implications: If vulnerable groups receiving enteral feedings are unable to accommodate with rapid insulin responses to wide fluctuations in blood glucose levels, these findings suggest that some enteral feeding options, such as no-fiber formula delivered over limited time periods, may be detrimental.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:09:47Z-
dc.date.issued1999-06-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:09:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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