2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156816
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pain Management Barriers Experienced by Older Adults with Arthritis
Abstract:
Pain Management Barriers Experienced by Older Adults with Arthritis
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Davis, Gail, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:Texas Woman's University-Denton
Title:Professor
Objective: The objective of the study was to discover the barriers to pain management experienced by older adults with arthritis and generate a model theorizing the relationships among the barriers. Design: The study used a qualitative grounded theory design. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Eight focus groups were held with older adults who met specific criteria for participation: age 65 or over, had self-reported arthritis, and could read and speak English. Four focus groups were held in long-term residential settings and four in senior citizen centers. Data collection and analysis extended over a one-year period (August 1999-August 2000). Concepts: The major concepts guiding both the formulation of the focus group questions and analysis of the data were (a) pain management and (b) barriers. As defined by the Principal Investigator (P.I.) through an earlier concept analysis, "pain management" was viewed as "success in taking care of or handling the pain by using certain actions and by directing and controlling one's own use of these actions". Drawing from several existing definitions, the concept of "barriers" was viewed as "factors, beliefs, and perceptions interfering with the performance of behaviors that promote pain relief, pain modulation, and pain management self-efficacy". These definitions assisted in guiding the inductive approach used by the investigators in exploring the barriers to pain management. Methods: Focus groups were used for data collection; open coding provided the basic approach to analysis, or the systematic identification of themes existing within the data. The one-hour discussions were guided by prepared questions. The P.I. served as moderator and the two co-investigators as assistant moderators; all three also participated in the data analysis. The audiotapes were transcribed and entered into a computerized data analysis program. Ten themes representing pain barriers were identified through open coding, with continuing refinement of the coding during the process. The relationships among these themes were explored; then, using axial coding, these were organized into a theoretical structure. Review of the data, as well as a review of related literature, provided "grounding". Findings: Ten major themes emerged: medication and nonpharmacological management issues, lack of access to healthcare or treatment, physical issues, healthcare provider relationships, age expectations, interference with distraction, emotional distress, issues related adaptive resource use, knowledge deficit, and sleep disturbances. Each theme, or category, had subcategories. Relationships among themes were then theorized, with 16 propositions resulting. Medication and nonpharmacological management issues (MNM) was identified as the central phenomenon. The resulting propositions are supported by the data, illustrating the complexity of pain management barriers that exist for older adults. Direct propositions involving MNM are as follows: (a) issues related to the use of adaptive resources, access to healthcare or treatment, healthcare provider relationships, age expectations, and knowledge deficit contribute to MNM and (b) emotional distress and physical factors are each associated with MNM. Conclusions: Findings suggest that existing pain management barriers for older adults with arthritis are more extensive than generally acknowledged. They are consistent with the conceptual definitions of "pain management" and "barriers". Barriers reflect factors, beliefs, and perceptions related to pain relief, pain modulation, and self-efficacy. Implications: Since it is clear that these barriers exist at a variety of levels (e.g., patient, provider, and system), solutions generated will need to be planned and directed appropriately.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePain Management Barriers Experienced by Older Adults with Arthritisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156816-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pain Management Barriers Experienced by Older Adults with Arthritis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Davis, Gail, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Texas Woman's University-Denton</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gdavis@mail.twu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The objective of the study was to discover the barriers to pain management experienced by older adults with arthritis and generate a model theorizing the relationships among the barriers. Design: The study used a qualitative grounded theory design. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Eight focus groups were held with older adults who met specific criteria for participation: age 65 or over, had self-reported arthritis, and could read and speak English. Four focus groups were held in long-term residential settings and four in senior citizen centers. Data collection and analysis extended over a one-year period (August 1999-August 2000). Concepts: The major concepts guiding both the formulation of the focus group questions and analysis of the data were (a) pain management and (b) barriers. As defined by the Principal Investigator (P.I.) through an earlier concept analysis, &quot;pain management&quot; was viewed as &quot;success in taking care of or handling the pain by using certain actions and by directing and controlling one's own use of these actions&quot;. Drawing from several existing definitions, the concept of &quot;barriers&quot; was viewed as &quot;factors, beliefs, and perceptions interfering with the performance of behaviors that promote pain relief, pain modulation, and pain management self-efficacy&quot;. These definitions assisted in guiding the inductive approach used by the investigators in exploring the barriers to pain management. Methods: Focus groups were used for data collection; open coding provided the basic approach to analysis, or the systematic identification of themes existing within the data. The one-hour discussions were guided by prepared questions. The P.I. served as moderator and the two co-investigators as assistant moderators; all three also participated in the data analysis. The audiotapes were transcribed and entered into a computerized data analysis program. Ten themes representing pain barriers were identified through open coding, with continuing refinement of the coding during the process. The relationships among these themes were explored; then, using axial coding, these were organized into a theoretical structure. Review of the data, as well as a review of related literature, provided &quot;grounding&quot;. Findings: Ten major themes emerged: medication and nonpharmacological management issues, lack of access to healthcare or treatment, physical issues, healthcare provider relationships, age expectations, interference with distraction, emotional distress, issues related adaptive resource use, knowledge deficit, and sleep disturbances. Each theme, or category, had subcategories. Relationships among themes were then theorized, with 16 propositions resulting. Medication and nonpharmacological management issues (MNM) was identified as the central phenomenon. The resulting propositions are supported by the data, illustrating the complexity of pain management barriers that exist for older adults. Direct propositions involving MNM are as follows: (a) issues related to the use of adaptive resources, access to healthcare or treatment, healthcare provider relationships, age expectations, and knowledge deficit contribute to MNM and (b) emotional distress and physical factors are each associated with MNM. Conclusions: Findings suggest that existing pain management barriers for older adults with arthritis are more extensive than generally acknowledged. They are consistent with the conceptual definitions of &quot;pain management&quot; and &quot;barriers&quot;. Barriers reflect factors, beliefs, and perceptions related to pain relief, pain modulation, and self-efficacy. Implications: Since it is clear that these barriers exist at a variety of levels (e.g., patient, provider, and system), solutions generated will need to be planned and directed appropriately.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:09:58Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:09:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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