The Impact of Nurse-Initiated Education on Patient Knowledge of Medications, Energy Conservation and Dyspnea Management

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156819
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of Nurse-Initiated Education on Patient Knowledge of Medications, Energy Conservation and Dyspnea Management
Abstract:
The Impact of Nurse-Initiated Education on Patient Knowledge of Medications, Energy Conservation and Dyspnea Management
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Moran, Phyllis
P.I. Institution Name:St. George Hospital & Community Health Service
OBJECTIVES: The effect of nurse initiated patient education on patient outcomes is an area of interest to many clinical nurses. The purpose of the study reported here was to determine the effectiveness of an educational intervention by nurses on patients' knowledge of their medications, energy conserving behaviour and dyspnea management after discharge from an acute care hospital. DESIGN: A comparative, prospective design was used to gather data on patient knowledge of their medications, energy conservation and dyspnea management on admission to hospital, just prior to discharge and within a month of discharge to home. SETTING/POPULATION: The study was conducted on a cardio-respiratory ward of a large metropolitan hospital located in Sydney Australia. There was an overflow of other medical specialties to this ward during the study period resulting in a wide and varied casemix population. The sample was 105 patients with diagnoses of Chronic Airways Limitation, Pneumonia and Congestive Cardiac Failure. Criteria for inclusion in the study was that patients had to be alert and oriented, able to communicate verbally and live at home. VARIABLES: Patients were assessed and verbally educated by Registered Nursing staff during hospitalisation about their knowledge of medications (name, action, amount, frequency and side effects), energy conserving techniques and dyspnea management. METHOD: Patient knowledge was evaluated and documented on three occasions: on admission, just prior to discharge and within a month after discharge to home. FINDINGS: Post discharge, the level of understanding of the name and action of their medication was significantly stronger than their knowledge of the amount, frequency and side effects of their medication. The fact that a vast majority of patients thought that they knew the amount of medication to take, but were incorrect, is of concern. Only about one half of patients acknowledged that they had received energy conservation/dyspnea management education while in hospital despite nursing documentation to the contrary. CONCLUSIONS: The study patients were very elderly, comorbid and on multiple medications. Furthermore, nearly 30% lived alone. It was found that the verbal education given by nurses was only marginally effective in all areas. IMPLICATIONS: Further research needs to be conducted to determine a more effective method of educating the elderly comorbid patient on significant information which will maintain their health and decrease morbidity and mortality, specifically medication administration and other symptom management.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of Nurse-Initiated Education on Patient Knowledge of Medications, Energy Conservation and Dyspnea Managementen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156819-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Impact of Nurse-Initiated Education on Patient Knowledge of Medications, Energy Conservation and Dyspnea Management</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Moran, Phyllis</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">St. George Hospital &amp; Community Health Service</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Moranp@sesahs.nsw.gov.au</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">OBJECTIVES: The effect of nurse initiated patient education on patient outcomes is an area of interest to many clinical nurses. The purpose of the study reported here was to determine the effectiveness of an educational intervention by nurses on patients' knowledge of their medications, energy conserving behaviour and dyspnea management after discharge from an acute care hospital. DESIGN: A comparative, prospective design was used to gather data on patient knowledge of their medications, energy conservation and dyspnea management on admission to hospital, just prior to discharge and within a month of discharge to home. SETTING/POPULATION: The study was conducted on a cardio-respiratory ward of a large metropolitan hospital located in Sydney Australia. There was an overflow of other medical specialties to this ward during the study period resulting in a wide and varied casemix population. The sample was 105 patients with diagnoses of Chronic Airways Limitation, Pneumonia and Congestive Cardiac Failure. Criteria for inclusion in the study was that patients had to be alert and oriented, able to communicate verbally and live at home. VARIABLES: Patients were assessed and verbally educated by Registered Nursing staff during hospitalisation about their knowledge of medications (name, action, amount, frequency and side effects), energy conserving techniques and dyspnea management. METHOD: Patient knowledge was evaluated and documented on three occasions: on admission, just prior to discharge and within a month after discharge to home. FINDINGS: Post discharge, the level of understanding of the name and action of their medication was significantly stronger than their knowledge of the amount, frequency and side effects of their medication. The fact that a vast majority of patients thought that they knew the amount of medication to take, but were incorrect, is of concern. Only about one half of patients acknowledged that they had received energy conservation/dyspnea management education while in hospital despite nursing documentation to the contrary. CONCLUSIONS: The study patients were very elderly, comorbid and on multiple medications. Furthermore, nearly 30% lived alone. It was found that the verbal education given by nurses was only marginally effective in all areas. IMPLICATIONS: Further research needs to be conducted to determine a more effective method of educating the elderly comorbid patient on significant information which will maintain their health and decrease morbidity and mortality, specifically medication administration and other symptom management.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:10:09Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:10:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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