Using a Prenatal Clinical Information System to Link Cost, Quality, and Satisfaction Outcomes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156820
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using a Prenatal Clinical Information System to Link Cost, Quality, and Satisfaction Outcomes
Abstract:
Using a Prenatal Clinical Information System to Link Cost, Quality, and Satisfaction Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Sackett, Kay
P.I. Institution Name:University at Buffalo, State University of New York
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: This abstract describes links between cost, quality, and satisfaction outcomes with a prenatal clinical-information system (ÒRight StartÓ) developed at a Western New York Managed Care Organization (MCO). Design: Using a case study format, the authors of this paper will describe links between cost, quality, satisfaction, and return-on-investment outcomes using a prenatal clinical-information system. Successful outcomes are dependent on the ability to monitor the perceptions of providers, consumers, and purchasers. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: In the United States, millions of dollars are spent annually to develop healthcare information systems (HCIS) that often fail to provide value or yield enhancements for providing or tracking care. However, effectively designed and appropriately implemented information and computing technology in a managed-care setting can reduce healthcare costs through accurate tracking and control of the utilization of services, thereby improving cost, quality, and satisfaction and return-on-investment outcomes. In 1997, the MCO highlighted in this paper developed a prenatal healthcare information system to identify high-risk mothers and ensure they receive the care they need to maximize the likelihood they would deliver healthy, full-term babies. The need for a prenatal program focused on high-risk pregnancies is supported by the high incidence of infant mortality (8.8%), pre-maturity (11.3%), and low birth weight infants (7.7%) in Western New York versus New York State as a whole. Additional compelling reasons for the development of this prenatal program included the following: (1) childbirth is the most common condition for admission among members; (2) prenatal care is a high volume specialty clinical area and a focus of the New York State Department of Health guidelines; and (3) childbirth is one of the highest costs in the Plan. Variables Studied Together: Initially, in order to measure the effectiveness of the Right Start Program, the following performance outcomes were used: (1) increased physician participation in program; (2) increased member registration in the program; (3) increased first trimester prenatal care; and (4) decreased rate of low birth weight babies. Methods: Today, in addition to the previously mentioned performance outcomes, the relationship to return on investment criteria is currently under study and development, using a prenatal clinical - information system. It is expected to include a comparison of the dollars spent to facilitate a positive pregnancy outcome for at risk members (moms) and babies, and normal members (moms) and babies, satisfaction with the pre and post-natal educational activities, physician and member satisfaction, decreased rate of low birth weight babies, and the relationship of these outcomes to National Commission on Quality Assurance (NCQA) quality indicators. Findings: Findings that demonstrate a comparison of the dollars spent to facilitate a positive pregnancy outcome for at risk members (moms) and babies, and normal members (moms) and babies, satisfaction with the pre and post-natal educational activities, physician and member satisfaction, decreased rate of low birth weight babies, and the relationship of these outcomes to National Commission on Quality Assurance (NCQA) quality indicators are currently in progress. A report of these findings will be presented at the conference. Conclusions: The goal of the software project for the Right Startã prenatal program was to develop and evaluate a database and patient tracking system for managing patient care information of a particular member population. Nurses have long documented patient information in a medical record with pen and paper. But nurses are no longer able to depend on traditional paper sources of information like the medical record for decision making and monitoring outcomes. Patient outcomes must be measured in the current healthcare environment recognizing the increasing complexity of care and care management. Implications: Historically, health care interventions were evaluated on the basis of their effects on physiologic outcomes, such as vital signs and laboratory values, clinical outcomes such as prognosis, or morbidity and mortality. Concurrently, health education initiatives focused on changes in knowledge, attitudes, or behaviors. Today, the health care services sectors have added outcomes based on patientsÕ perspectives of their day-to-day functioning and well-being, satisfaction from patient and provider perspectives, in addition to return on investment.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing a Prenatal Clinical Information System to Link Cost, Quality, and Satisfaction Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156820-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using a Prenatal Clinical Information System to Link Cost, Quality, and Satisfaction Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sackett, Kay</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University at Buffalo, State University of New York</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kaysack@buffalo.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This abstract describes links between cost, quality, and satisfaction outcomes with a prenatal clinical-information system (&Ograve;Right Start&Oacute;) developed at a Western New York Managed Care Organization (MCO). Design: Using a case study format, the authors of this paper will describe links between cost, quality, satisfaction, and return-on-investment outcomes using a prenatal clinical-information system. Successful outcomes are dependent on the ability to monitor the perceptions of providers, consumers, and purchasers. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: In the United States, millions of dollars are spent annually to develop healthcare information systems (HCIS) that often fail to provide value or yield enhancements for providing or tracking care. However, effectively designed and appropriately implemented information and computing technology in a managed-care setting can reduce healthcare costs through accurate tracking and control of the utilization of services, thereby improving cost, quality, and satisfaction and return-on-investment outcomes. In 1997, the MCO highlighted in this paper developed a prenatal healthcare information system to identify high-risk mothers and ensure they receive the care they need to maximize the likelihood they would deliver healthy, full-term babies. The need for a prenatal program focused on high-risk pregnancies is supported by the high incidence of infant mortality (8.8%), pre-maturity (11.3%), and low birth weight infants (7.7%) in Western New York versus New York State as a whole. Additional compelling reasons for the development of this prenatal program included the following: (1) childbirth is the most common condition for admission among members; (2) prenatal care is a high volume specialty clinical area and a focus of the New York State Department of Health guidelines; and (3) childbirth is one of the highest costs in the Plan. Variables Studied Together: Initially, in order to measure the effectiveness of the Right Start Program, the following performance outcomes were used: (1) increased physician participation in program; (2) increased member registration in the program; (3) increased first trimester prenatal care; and (4) decreased rate of low birth weight babies. Methods: Today, in addition to the previously mentioned performance outcomes, the relationship to return on investment criteria is currently under study and development, using a prenatal clinical - information system. It is expected to include a comparison of the dollars spent to facilitate a positive pregnancy outcome for at risk members (moms) and babies, and normal members (moms) and babies, satisfaction with the pre and post-natal educational activities, physician and member satisfaction, decreased rate of low birth weight babies, and the relationship of these outcomes to National Commission on Quality Assurance (NCQA) quality indicators. Findings: Findings that demonstrate a comparison of the dollars spent to facilitate a positive pregnancy outcome for at risk members (moms) and babies, and normal members (moms) and babies, satisfaction with the pre and post-natal educational activities, physician and member satisfaction, decreased rate of low birth weight babies, and the relationship of these outcomes to National Commission on Quality Assurance (NCQA) quality indicators are currently in progress. A report of these findings will be presented at the conference. Conclusions: The goal of the software project for the Right Start&atilde; prenatal program was to develop and evaluate a database and patient tracking system for managing patient care information of a particular member population. Nurses have long documented patient information in a medical record with pen and paper. But nurses are no longer able to depend on traditional paper sources of information like the medical record for decision making and monitoring outcomes. Patient outcomes must be measured in the current healthcare environment recognizing the increasing complexity of care and care management. Implications: Historically, health care interventions were evaluated on the basis of their effects on physiologic outcomes, such as vital signs and laboratory values, clinical outcomes such as prognosis, or morbidity and mortality. Concurrently, health education initiatives focused on changes in knowledge, attitudes, or behaviors. Today, the health care services sectors have added outcomes based on patients&Otilde; perspectives of their day-to-day functioning and well-being, satisfaction from patient and provider perspectives, in addition to return on investment.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:10:13Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:10:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.