Effectiveness of Relaxation Strategies for Promotion of Sleep in Clinical Settings: A Meta-Analysis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156823
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effectiveness of Relaxation Strategies for Promotion of Sleep in Clinical Settings: A Meta-Analysis
Abstract:
Effectiveness of Relaxation Strategies for Promotion of Sleep in Clinical Settings: A Meta-Analysis
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Floyd, Judith, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: The study focused on relaxation strategies practiced by nurses and examined the magnitude of improvement in sleep experienced by treated subjects. Insomnia is a frequent companion of aging, illness, and hospitalization; thus, nurses often are present when insomnia manifests. Nurses are in the position to implement relaxation strategies for the promotion of sleep, but may be unaware of the evidence-base that supports of fails to support their nursing actions because research results have not been synthesized and made available to them. Design: Meta-analysis was used to summarize results from previously reported studies. Population, Sample, Setting, and Years: The population was all studies of relaxation interventions in which at least one aspect of sleep was a measured outcome. All studies reported in English between 1960-2000 were eligible. No limitation was placed on the settings in which the studies were conducted. Potential studies (N=32) were identified by review of abstracts from both paper and electronic indexes. Sources of unpublished studies were searched including the Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI) Registry of Nursing Research. Intervention and Outcome Variables: Interventions examined were those that have been identified as promoting sleep through the mechanism of relaxation. Outcomes examined were those of interest to nurses including standard sleep parameters (e.g., time to fall asleep, waking duration, sleep amount), satisfaction with sleep, and important daytime sequelae of poor sleep (e.g., fatigue, dysphoria, functional limitations). Methods: Nurses’ sleep promotion interventions and the outcomes considered important to nurses were identified in an earlier research synthesis using the arcs© software system to map the domain of sleep promotion research through 1996. This study built on and extended the earlier work by using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) to store and analyze study characteristics and to conduct quantitative analyses of effect sizes, i.e., to do the meta-analysis. Study qualities were coded using the third edition of the STTI Classification System of conceptualizations, designs, sampling, samples, settings, measurement, analysis, and funding. Information about each relationship studied also was coded including the specific intervention and outcome studied together and the statistic used, its sign, direction, and magnitude, and the probability of results. In addition, publication and retrieval characteristics were coded for each report along with ratings of study quality. SPSS was used to calculate the effect size, Hedges d, and examine study features correlated with the magnitude of d. Findings: Studies of a wide variety of relaxation interventions were found including many variations in muscle relaxation, various meditation strategies, and occasional studies of music and bedtime activities thought to be relaxing. Effect sizes ranged from small (d< .2) to large (d>.8) depending on the type of relaxation intervention studied and methods used. Most relaxation interventions that were evaluated in nursing care environments had not been replicated. The better-designed studies generated smaller, but statistically significant, treatment effect sizes. Conclusions: Many relaxation strategies used by nurses have a positive effect on sleep. Better-designed studies are needed to accurately determine the magnitude of the effects of different relaxation approaches. To be more useful to nurses worldwide, the review needs to be expanded to include relaxation studies reported in languages other than English. Research collaborators are being sought for this expansion. Implications: Short-term insomnia during illness and hospitalization adds to patient burden, may slow recovery, and can lead to chronic insomnia. Once chronic, insomnia is difficult and costly to treat. Relaxation strategies, unlike more specialized therapies, are easily implemented in a variety of care settings. Nurses can have confidence that the effectiveness of relaxation approaches is supported by research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffectiveness of Relaxation Strategies for Promotion of Sleep in Clinical Settings: A Meta-Analysisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156823-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effectiveness of Relaxation Strategies for Promotion of Sleep in Clinical Settings: A Meta-Analysis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Floyd, Judith, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">judith.floyd@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The study focused on relaxation strategies practiced by nurses and examined the magnitude of improvement in sleep experienced by treated subjects. Insomnia is a frequent companion of aging, illness, and hospitalization; thus, nurses often are present when insomnia manifests. Nurses are in the position to implement relaxation strategies for the promotion of sleep, but may be unaware of the evidence-base that supports of fails to support their nursing actions because research results have not been synthesized and made available to them. Design: Meta-analysis was used to summarize results from previously reported studies. Population, Sample, Setting, and Years: The population was all studies of relaxation interventions in which at least one aspect of sleep was a measured outcome. All studies reported in English between 1960-2000 were eligible. No limitation was placed on the settings in which the studies were conducted. Potential studies (N=32) were identified by review of abstracts from both paper and electronic indexes. Sources of unpublished studies were searched including the Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI) Registry of Nursing Research. Intervention and Outcome Variables: Interventions examined were those that have been identified as promoting sleep through the mechanism of relaxation. Outcomes examined were those of interest to nurses including standard sleep parameters (e.g., time to fall asleep, waking duration, sleep amount), satisfaction with sleep, and important daytime sequelae of poor sleep (e.g., fatigue, dysphoria, functional limitations). Methods: Nurses&rsquo; sleep promotion interventions and the outcomes considered important to nurses were identified in an earlier research synthesis using the arcs&copy; software system to map the domain of sleep promotion research through 1996. This study built on and extended the earlier work by using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) to store and analyze study characteristics and to conduct quantitative analyses of effect sizes, i.e., to do the meta-analysis. Study qualities were coded using the third edition of the STTI Classification System of conceptualizations, designs, sampling, samples, settings, measurement, analysis, and funding. Information about each relationship studied also was coded including the specific intervention and outcome studied together and the statistic used, its sign, direction, and magnitude, and the probability of results. In addition, publication and retrieval characteristics were coded for each report along with ratings of study quality. SPSS was used to calculate the effect size, Hedges d, and examine study features correlated with the magnitude of d. Findings: Studies of a wide variety of relaxation interventions were found including many variations in muscle relaxation, various meditation strategies, and occasional studies of music and bedtime activities thought to be relaxing. Effect sizes ranged from small (d&lt; .2) to large (d&gt;.8) depending on the type of relaxation intervention studied and methods used. Most relaxation interventions that were evaluated in nursing care environments had not been replicated. The better-designed studies generated smaller, but statistically significant, treatment effect sizes. Conclusions: Many relaxation strategies used by nurses have a positive effect on sleep. Better-designed studies are needed to accurately determine the magnitude of the effects of different relaxation approaches. To be more useful to nurses worldwide, the review needs to be expanded to include relaxation studies reported in languages other than English. Research collaborators are being sought for this expansion. Implications: Short-term insomnia during illness and hospitalization adds to patient burden, may slow recovery, and can lead to chronic insomnia. Once chronic, insomnia is difficult and costly to treat. Relaxation strategies, unlike more specialized therapies, are easily implemented in a variety of care settings. Nurses can have confidence that the effectiveness of relaxation approaches is supported by research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:10:20Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:10:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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