Testing the Assessment of Strategies in Families in Finland: Lessons about Culture

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156824
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Testing the Assessment of Strategies in Families in Finland: Lessons about Culture
Abstract:
Testing the Assessment of Strategies in Families in Finland: Lessons about Culture
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Friedemann, Marie-Luise, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Florida International University
Title:
Objective: The purpose of this paper is to raise the readers’ awareness of many challenges related to the translation of a family assessment instrument and its adaptation to another culture. The development of a Finnish version of the Assessment of Strategies in Families-Effectiveness (ASF-E) is described. Design: Translation and cultural analysis of the items on the ASF-E instrument occurred first. The instrument was then tested for construct validity in relation to the underlying framework of systemic organization (Friedemann, 1995) and for reliability of the subscales and the total scale. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The Finnish ASF-E was tested with 196 patients of two ambulatory clinics in Tampere, Finland. Of these patients, 76% were women; 73% were married or lived together; all were highly educated. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: The concepts of family stability, growth, control and connectedness/spirituality are in focus. The usefulness and cultural fit of the items for measuring these core concepts is discussed and differences between U.S. and Finnish families are highlighted. Methods: Instrument development encompassed item translation, discussion of cultural relevance, and back-translation. Cultural analysis and fine-tuning of items was done with 30 Finnish Nursing students. Principal component analysis with Varimax orthogonal rotation and reliability testing were used. Findings: The theoretical constructs were represented in the obtained four-factor structure and could be measured by sub-scales with reliability ranging from .65 to .83. Conclusions: Homogeneity of the Finnish culture was apparent. Handling conflict was a major distinguishing feature of Finnish families. Finns expect conflict and deal with it as part of family stability while in the U.S. avoidance of conflict seemed more prominent in families. Other differences were family interchange with the community and the nature of family closeness. Implications: Insights contribute to further instrument development and a broader understanding of the role of culture in families. Nurses who adapt instruments to another culture are advised to pretest the cultural appropriateness of each item by letting potential respondents report their thought processes when they complete the items.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTesting the Assessment of Strategies in Families in Finland: Lessons about Cultureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156824-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Testing the Assessment of Strategies in Families in Finland: Lessons about Culture</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Friedemann, Marie-Luise, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Florida International University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">friedemm@fiu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this paper is to raise the readers&rsquo; awareness of many challenges related to the translation of a family assessment instrument and its adaptation to another culture. The development of a Finnish version of the Assessment of Strategies in Families-Effectiveness (ASF-E) is described. Design: Translation and cultural analysis of the items on the ASF-E instrument occurred first. The instrument was then tested for construct validity in relation to the underlying framework of systemic organization (Friedemann, 1995) and for reliability of the subscales and the total scale. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The Finnish ASF-E was tested with 196 patients of two ambulatory clinics in Tampere, Finland. Of these patients, 76% were women; 73% were married or lived together; all were highly educated. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: The concepts of family stability, growth, control and connectedness/spirituality are in focus. The usefulness and cultural fit of the items for measuring these core concepts is discussed and differences between U.S. and Finnish families are highlighted. Methods: Instrument development encompassed item translation, discussion of cultural relevance, and back-translation. Cultural analysis and fine-tuning of items was done with 30 Finnish Nursing students. Principal component analysis with Varimax orthogonal rotation and reliability testing were used. Findings: The theoretical constructs were represented in the obtained four-factor structure and could be measured by sub-scales with reliability ranging from .65 to .83. Conclusions: Homogeneity of the Finnish culture was apparent. Handling conflict was a major distinguishing feature of Finnish families. Finns expect conflict and deal with it as part of family stability while in the U.S. avoidance of conflict seemed more prominent in families. Other differences were family interchange with the community and the nature of family closeness. Implications: Insights contribute to further instrument development and a broader understanding of the role of culture in families. Nurses who adapt instruments to another culture are advised to pretest the cultural appropriateness of each item by letting potential respondents report their thought processes when they complete the items.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:10:24Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:10:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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