Development of an Assessment Process to Measure Patient Adjustment to a Diagnosis of Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156825
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development of an Assessment Process to Measure Patient Adjustment to a Diagnosis of Cancer
Abstract:
Development of an Assessment Process to Measure Patient Adjustment to a Diagnosis of Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Frost, Marlene
P.I. Institution Name:Mayo Clinic Woman’s Cancer Program
Objective: The purpose of this research is to develop an efficient and effective approach for measuring factors that put individuals at risk for poor psychological, social, and spiritual adjustment. Design: Descriptive. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The population is comprised of individuals with a diagnosis of cancer stratified by stage of disease (newly diagnosed, adjuvant therapy, stable disease, recurrent disease) and cancer type (ovarian, colon, prostate, lung, and breast). For this study, a sample of 100 individuals from one large tertiary medical center in the Midwest will be surveyed. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Psychosocial adjustment, emotional well-being, physical well-being, functional well-being, social/family well-being, symptom distress, trait anxiety, social support, resources, substance abuse, physical abuse, psychological distress. Methods: This descriptive study, based on Lazarus and Folkman’s conception of stress and coping, is designed to compare the relative clinical significance of three sources of data: information currently included in the patient’s chart, a questionnaire packet that includes structured questionnaires (FACT-G, POMS, Symptom Distress Scale, STAI) and single item questions that address each concept of interest, and information obtained from an interview conducted by a healthcare professional. A panel of clinicians and researchers will assess the ability of the data to identify differences among subjects (e.g. variance in responses) and provide direction for intervention. Initial validity during the pilot phase will be determined by judgement of the panel of clinicians and researchers. Subsequently, correlative and comparative analyses will be carried out among data collected on the same concept. The degree of concordance and redundancy among the information gleaned from the various data sources will be determined using paired comparisons and the methods of Bland and Altman Findings: Preliminary data are currently being analyzed. Conclusions: Not applicable. Implications: Identifying distressed patients has been identified as an important issue for clinical oncology practice. We assert that it is important to not only identify individuals experiencing distress but to also identify individuals at increased risk for poor psychosocial adjustment. Identification of individuals at increased risk for poor psychosocial adjustment will permit early intervention. Further, results of this research will lead to a triaging process so that the limited available clinical resources that provide psychosocial support for cancer patients can be applied in an efficient manner.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment of an Assessment Process to Measure Patient Adjustment to a Diagnosis of Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156825-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Development of an Assessment Process to Measure Patient Adjustment to a Diagnosis of Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Frost, Marlene</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Mayo Clinic Woman&rsquo;s Cancer Program</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">frost.marlene@mayo.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this research is to develop an efficient and effective approach for measuring factors that put individuals at risk for poor psychological, social, and spiritual adjustment. Design: Descriptive. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The population is comprised of individuals with a diagnosis of cancer stratified by stage of disease (newly diagnosed, adjuvant therapy, stable disease, recurrent disease) and cancer type (ovarian, colon, prostate, lung, and breast). For this study, a sample of 100 individuals from one large tertiary medical center in the Midwest will be surveyed. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Psychosocial adjustment, emotional well-being, physical well-being, functional well-being, social/family well-being, symptom distress, trait anxiety, social support, resources, substance abuse, physical abuse, psychological distress. Methods: This descriptive study, based on Lazarus and Folkman&rsquo;s conception of stress and coping, is designed to compare the relative clinical significance of three sources of data: information currently included in the patient&rsquo;s chart, a questionnaire packet that includes structured questionnaires (FACT-G, POMS, Symptom Distress Scale, STAI) and single item questions that address each concept of interest, and information obtained from an interview conducted by a healthcare professional. A panel of clinicians and researchers will assess the ability of the data to identify differences among subjects (e.g. variance in responses) and provide direction for intervention. Initial validity during the pilot phase will be determined by judgement of the panel of clinicians and researchers. Subsequently, correlative and comparative analyses will be carried out among data collected on the same concept. The degree of concordance and redundancy among the information gleaned from the various data sources will be determined using paired comparisons and the methods of Bland and Altman Findings: Preliminary data are currently being analyzed. Conclusions: Not applicable. Implications: Identifying distressed patients has been identified as an important issue for clinical oncology practice. We assert that it is important to not only identify individuals experiencing distress but to also identify individuals at increased risk for poor psychosocial adjustment. Identification of individuals at increased risk for poor psychosocial adjustment will permit early intervention. Further, results of this research will lead to a triaging process so that the limited available clinical resources that provide psychosocial support for cancer patients can be applied in an efficient manner.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:10:27Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:10:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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