The effect of a social support boosting intervention on stress, coping, and social support in primary caregivers of children with HIV/AIDS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156827
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The effect of a social support boosting intervention on stress, coping, and social support in primary caregivers of children with HIV/AIDS
Abstract:
The effect of a social support boosting intervention on stress, coping, and social support in primary caregivers of children with HIV/AIDS
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Hansell, Phyllis, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:Seton Hall University
Title:Chair Graduate Nursing Department
Background: Caring for the HIV-infected child is challenging and affects the entire family system. Studies have show that social support can mitigate caregiver stress and enhance coping; however, social support may not always result in a positive outcome for the recipient. Objectives: (1) To measure caregiver stress, coping, and social support, (2) To test the effect of a social support boosting intervention on levels of stress, coping, and social support among caregivers of children with HIV/AIDS. Methods: An experimental design with repeated measures at 6 months and 12 months was used to test an intervention protocol aimed at boosting caregiver's levels of social support. The stratified random sample included 68 primary caregivers of children with HIV/AIDS. Strata were seropositive caregivers (biological parents) and seronegative caregivers (foster parents and extended family members). The intervention was administered monthly for 12 months. The study measures, which included, The Derogatis Stress Profile, F-COPES, and The Tilden Interpersonal Relationship Inventory, were taken upon entry into the study, at 6 months, and at 12 months. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and repeated measure MANOVA. Results: Although there were no statistically significant treatment group differences when the caregiver strata were combined, there were statistically significant differences between the experimental and control groups on changes in the outcome variables over time when strata were included as a factor in the analysis. Univariate F-tests indicated that the level of social support for caregivers who were seronegative in the experimental group was significantly different [F (1,64) = 10.49, p = .002] from seronegative caregivers in the control group. There were no significant treatment group differences found for caregivers who were seropositive. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that over time caregivers who were seronegative (foster parents and extended family members) derived significant benefit from the social support boosting intervention implemented in this study. Seronegative caregivers who acquire children with HIV/AIDS are faced with a challenging complex stressful situation and have a critical need to enhance their social support, which is achievable through the use of this study intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe effect of a social support boosting intervention on stress, coping, and social support in primary caregivers of children with HIV/AIDSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156827-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The effect of a social support boosting intervention on stress, coping, and social support in primary caregivers of children with HIV/AIDS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hansell, Phyllis, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Seton Hall University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Chair Graduate Nursing Department</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Hanselph@shu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Caring for the HIV-infected child is challenging and affects the entire family system. Studies have show that social support can mitigate caregiver stress and enhance coping; however, social support may not always result in a positive outcome for the recipient. Objectives: (1) To measure caregiver stress, coping, and social support, (2) To test the effect of a social support boosting intervention on levels of stress, coping, and social support among caregivers of children with HIV/AIDS. Methods: An experimental design with repeated measures at 6 months and 12 months was used to test an intervention protocol aimed at boosting caregiver's levels of social support. The stratified random sample included 68 primary caregivers of children with HIV/AIDS. Strata were seropositive caregivers (biological parents) and seronegative caregivers (foster parents and extended family members). The intervention was administered monthly for 12 months. The study measures, which included, The Derogatis Stress Profile, F-COPES, and The Tilden Interpersonal Relationship Inventory, were taken upon entry into the study, at 6 months, and at 12 months. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and repeated measure MANOVA. Results: Although there were no statistically significant treatment group differences when the caregiver strata were combined, there were statistically significant differences between the experimental and control groups on changes in the outcome variables over time when strata were included as a factor in the analysis. Univariate F-tests indicated that the level of social support for caregivers who were seronegative in the experimental group was significantly different [F (1,64) = 10.49, p = .002] from seronegative caregivers in the control group. There were no significant treatment group differences found for caregivers who were seropositive. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that over time caregivers who were seronegative (foster parents and extended family members) derived significant benefit from the social support boosting intervention implemented in this study. Seronegative caregivers who acquire children with HIV/AIDS are faced with a challenging complex stressful situation and have a critical need to enhance their social support, which is achievable through the use of this study intervention.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:10:34Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:10:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.