Patterns of problems and solutions experienced by caregivers of children with HIV/AIDS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156828
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patterns of problems and solutions experienced by caregivers of children with HIV/AIDS
Abstract:
Patterns of problems and solutions experienced by caregivers of children with HIV/AIDS
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Hansell, Phyllis, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:Seton Hall University
Title:Chair Graduate Nursing Department
Background: Caregivers of Children with HIV/AIDS are confronted with numerous problems that threaten the integrity of their family system. For them effective problem solving is essential to mitigate stress and facilitate coping. The data for the present study comes from a larger intervention study. The sample included 70 primary caregivers of children with HIV/AIDS. At monthly intervals, the investigator and the caregiver met for the intervention, and the effectiveness of the plan was evaluated and revised as necessary. In addition to the quantitative data collected through the fixed response questionnaires, a considerable amount of qualitative data were collected. These data were derived from the copious notes that the investigator recorded on the structured flow sheet used to monitor the intervention continuously. The structured flow sheet incorporated caregiver problems, resources, goals, plans for meeting goals, along with subjective (caregiver evaluation) and objective evaluation (investigator evaluation) of the intervention outcomes. This rich source of data was analyzed in the present study using qualitative methods. The purpose of the present study was to determine the patterns of problems identified by caregivers of children with HIV/AIDS and to describe effective problem resolution over a 6-month period. Methodology: Using the appropriate steps of content analysis, first the narrative comments recorded on the structured flow sheet were transcribed into computer files. Next themes describing patterns of problems identified by the caregivers were determined. Themes were categorized as those related to: (1) the health care system (2) physical well being of self and child (3) emotional well-being (4) social issues (5) domestic issues and (6) vocational issues. Once the set of categories were determined, experts in the field evaluated the relevance, clarity, and completeness of the scheme. Next explicit coding and scoring instructions were developed. The categorical scheme was pretested by applying it to small portions of the content to be analyzed. At least two coders (graduate nursing students) were asked to analyze the same material so that interrater reliability could be assessed and discrepancies clarified. Lastly the data were coded and tabulated according to the prescribed procedures established in advance. In addition to the content analysis, an analysis of the quantitative data collection from a problem checklist completed by caregivers in the larger study was used to provide qualified support for the themes derived from the qualitative data. Conclusions: The patterns of problems experienced by these caregivers of children with HIV/AIDS were numerous. Most of the caregivers experiencing similar patterns of problems as identified and described. The solutions to these clusters of problems were problem specific and focused on the effective use of problem solving strategies. This highlights the fact that effective solutions are achieved for those caregivers who are able to develop effective problem solving strategies aimed at problem resolution. For these caregivers HIV/AIDS is one of many problems that challenge their families every day of their lives.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatterns of problems and solutions experienced by caregivers of children with HIV/AIDSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156828-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patterns of problems and solutions experienced by caregivers of children with HIV/AIDS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hansell, Phyllis, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Seton Hall University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Chair Graduate Nursing Department</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Hanselph@shu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Caregivers of Children with HIV/AIDS are confronted with numerous problems that threaten the integrity of their family system. For them effective problem solving is essential to mitigate stress and facilitate coping. The data for the present study comes from a larger intervention study. The sample included 70 primary caregivers of children with HIV/AIDS. At monthly intervals, the investigator and the caregiver met for the intervention, and the effectiveness of the plan was evaluated and revised as necessary. In addition to the quantitative data collected through the fixed response questionnaires, a considerable amount of qualitative data were collected. These data were derived from the copious notes that the investigator recorded on the structured flow sheet used to monitor the intervention continuously. The structured flow sheet incorporated caregiver problems, resources, goals, plans for meeting goals, along with subjective (caregiver evaluation) and objective evaluation (investigator evaluation) of the intervention outcomes. This rich source of data was analyzed in the present study using qualitative methods. The purpose of the present study was to determine the patterns of problems identified by caregivers of children with HIV/AIDS and to describe effective problem resolution over a 6-month period. Methodology: Using the appropriate steps of content analysis, first the narrative comments recorded on the structured flow sheet were transcribed into computer files. Next themes describing patterns of problems identified by the caregivers were determined. Themes were categorized as those related to: (1) the health care system (2) physical well being of self and child (3) emotional well-being (4) social issues (5) domestic issues and (6) vocational issues. Once the set of categories were determined, experts in the field evaluated the relevance, clarity, and completeness of the scheme. Next explicit coding and scoring instructions were developed. The categorical scheme was pretested by applying it to small portions of the content to be analyzed. At least two coders (graduate nursing students) were asked to analyze the same material so that interrater reliability could be assessed and discrepancies clarified. Lastly the data were coded and tabulated according to the prescribed procedures established in advance. In addition to the content analysis, an analysis of the quantitative data collection from a problem checklist completed by caregivers in the larger study was used to provide qualified support for the themes derived from the qualitative data. Conclusions: The patterns of problems experienced by these caregivers of children with HIV/AIDS were numerous. Most of the caregivers experiencing similar patterns of problems as identified and described. The solutions to these clusters of problems were problem specific and focused on the effective use of problem solving strategies. This highlights the fact that effective solutions are achieved for those caregivers who are able to develop effective problem solving strategies aimed at problem resolution. For these caregivers HIV/AIDS is one of many problems that challenge their families every day of their lives.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:10:38Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:10:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.