Managing Personal Integrity: A Grounded Theory of Elderly People Surviving Hospitalization

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156829
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Managing Personal Integrity: A Grounded Theory of Elderly People Surviving Hospitalization
Abstract:
Managing Personal Integrity: A Grounded Theory of Elderly People Surviving Hospitalization
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Jacelon, Cynthia
P.I. Institution Name:University of Massachusetts-Amherst
Objective: To develop a substantive theory of the social processes engaged in by elderly people while in the hospital. Areas investigated included the perceptions, experience, and actions of hospitalized elders as described by the elderly persons, family members, and nurses; and the experience of the hospitalized elder as documented in the medical record. Design: Grounded Theory, Theoretical framework: Symbolic Interactionism. Population, Sample, Setting: Five hospitalized elderly participants, each was at least 75 years old who has been admitted to an acute care hospital in rural New England for non-surgical reasons. Nurses: Registered Nurses who worked with the hospitalized elderly person. Family Member: Someone identified by the hospitalized elderly person as being a family member. The number of participants was not pre-determined but determined by data saturation. Methods: Multiple data sources including extensive participant observation, interviews of all participants, and medical records were used. The database contained transcripts of 25 interviews, 40 participant observation logs, five medical record transcriptions, numerous reflective and methods logs, dated memos on development of the theory, and records of participant checking. A peer research group and an audit contributed to the credibility and dependability of the research. Findings: The derived theory is entitled Managing Personal Integrity. Personal Integrity is a dynamic, intrinsic quality of the self with properties composed of physical and psychological attributes. The three properties, health, dignity, and autonomy, may increase or decrease together, or an increase in one property can have compensate for decreases in other properties. Managing Personal Integrity is a dynamic process in which the elderly individual uses introspective, interactive, and active strategies to enhance his or her Personal Integrity in order to improve the chances of surviving hospitalization. The process begins with the elderly individual while in his/her usual state identifies an alteration in health. When the alteration in health becomes unbearable, the elderly individual seeks consultation from family and health care providers. The focus of strategies changes according to the phase of hospitalization. Early in the hospitalization, during the phase of stabilizing personal integrity the elderly individual is focused on his or her health. During the phase of repairing personal integrity, usually occurring during the middle of the hospital stay, the individual is focused on dignity. During the reintegrating phase, usually the last phase prior to discharge, the elderly individual is focused on regaining autonomy. Upon returning home the elderly individual engages in a period of getting adjusted and moves toward being in an evolved usual state. Discussion: The perspective that the elderly person is actively engaged in creating meaning and engaging in strategies to effect the outcomes of hospitalization is unique to this research. The concept Personal Integrity was compared to other uses of the phrase found in the literature. Health in the current research was found narrow. This is related to the fact that attributes of health arose from the data. Dignity was consistent with current definitions, autonomy was found similar but not identical to definitions in the literature. The hospital as the context of the theory and relationships between hospitalized elderly people and hospital staff or family members were consistent with the literature. Implications: The theory of Managing Personal Integrity has implications for nursing education in that increased attention must be given to client’s role in managing their health Implications for practice include developing awareness of the phases of hospitalization and for research lie in further explication of the theory, and testing of the concepts and propositions of the theory.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleManaging Personal Integrity: A Grounded Theory of Elderly People Surviving Hospitalizationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156829-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Managing Personal Integrity: A Grounded Theory of Elderly People Surviving Hospitalization</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jacelon, Cynthia</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Massachusetts-Amherst</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jacelon@nursing.umass.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To develop a substantive theory of the social processes engaged in by elderly people while in the hospital. Areas investigated included the perceptions, experience, and actions of hospitalized elders as described by the elderly persons, family members, and nurses; and the experience of the hospitalized elder as documented in the medical record. Design: Grounded Theory, Theoretical framework: Symbolic Interactionism. Population, Sample, Setting: Five hospitalized elderly participants, each was at least 75 years old who has been admitted to an acute care hospital in rural New England for non-surgical reasons. Nurses: Registered Nurses who worked with the hospitalized elderly person. Family Member: Someone identified by the hospitalized elderly person as being a family member. The number of participants was not pre-determined but determined by data saturation. Methods: Multiple data sources including extensive participant observation, interviews of all participants, and medical records were used. The database contained transcripts of 25 interviews, 40 participant observation logs, five medical record transcriptions, numerous reflective and methods logs, dated memos on development of the theory, and records of participant checking. A peer research group and an audit contributed to the credibility and dependability of the research. Findings: The derived theory is entitled Managing Personal Integrity. Personal Integrity is a dynamic, intrinsic quality of the self with properties composed of physical and psychological attributes. The three properties, health, dignity, and autonomy, may increase or decrease together, or an increase in one property can have compensate for decreases in other properties. Managing Personal Integrity is a dynamic process in which the elderly individual uses introspective, interactive, and active strategies to enhance his or her Personal Integrity in order to improve the chances of surviving hospitalization. The process begins with the elderly individual while in his/her usual state identifies an alteration in health. When the alteration in health becomes unbearable, the elderly individual seeks consultation from family and health care providers. The focus of strategies changes according to the phase of hospitalization. Early in the hospitalization, during the phase of stabilizing personal integrity the elderly individual is focused on his or her health. During the phase of repairing personal integrity, usually occurring during the middle of the hospital stay, the individual is focused on dignity. During the reintegrating phase, usually the last phase prior to discharge, the elderly individual is focused on regaining autonomy. Upon returning home the elderly individual engages in a period of getting adjusted and moves toward being in an evolved usual state. Discussion: The perspective that the elderly person is actively engaged in creating meaning and engaging in strategies to effect the outcomes of hospitalization is unique to this research. The concept Personal Integrity was compared to other uses of the phrase found in the literature. Health in the current research was found narrow. This is related to the fact that attributes of health arose from the data. Dignity was consistent with current definitions, autonomy was found similar but not identical to definitions in the literature. The hospital as the context of the theory and relationships between hospitalized elderly people and hospital staff or family members were consistent with the literature. Implications: The theory of Managing Personal Integrity has implications for nursing education in that increased attention must be given to client&rsquo;s role in managing their health Implications for practice include developing awareness of the phases of hospitalization and for research lie in further explication of the theory, and testing of the concepts and propositions of the theory.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:10:42Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:10:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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