2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156830
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comfort Care: The Art of Palliative Nursing
Abstract:
Comfort Care: The Art of Palliative Nursing
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Kolcaba, Katharine, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Akron
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: A theoretical framework for palliative nursing is presented, based on The Theory of Comfort. It facilitates decisions about care and desired outcomes, based on standards of care that mandate comfort and a peaceful and dignified death. The framework can be applied to patients and their family members. The purpose of this research was to test instruments for measuring holistic comfort in patients near end of life. Design: Psychometric study. The End of Life Comfort Questionnaire (EOLCQ) has 49 items with a six-response Likert type format, with higher scores indicating higher comfort. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The theory is designed for use by nurses in palliative and hospice care. The instruments were tested with 38 patient-family dyads. The Total Comfort (TC) Line was a ten-centimeter line having vertical orientation. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: needs of patients and family members, interventions (comfort measures), comfort, peaceful death, institutional integrity. [See <www.uakron.edu/comfort. Methods: To test the theory, instruments were designed to measure comfort in patients and involved caregivers. The EOLCQ was administered one time to each patient and family member and the TC Line was administered twice with 20 minutes between each administration. Findings: Cronbach’s alpha was .92 for patients and .89 for family members. Test-retest reliability for the TC Line was .77 for patients and .88 for family. For this group, 85% of the caregivers and 80% of the patients responded within one standard deviation (two centimeters) on the ten-centimeter line. Conclusions: The EOLCQ and TC Line have adequate psychometric properties for use in research with this population. The TC Line also is useful for clinical inquiries about patients and caregivers’ comfort. The question, “How would you rate your comfort on a scale of one to ten, with ten being the lowest comfort?” can elicit discussions about detractors from holistic comfort. Implications: Palliative care places a high priority on functional and psychological comfort for patients and family members. Applying the framework of comfort care will facilitate the achievement of the goals of palliative nursing. The instruments above are appropriate for testing the framework and the effectiveness of specific comfort measures.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComfort Care: The Art of Palliative Nursingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156830-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comfort Care: The Art of Palliative Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kolcaba, Katharine, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kolcaba@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: A theoretical framework for palliative nursing is presented, based on The Theory of Comfort. It facilitates decisions about care and desired outcomes, based on standards of care that mandate comfort and a peaceful and dignified death. The framework can be applied to patients and their family members. The purpose of this research was to test instruments for measuring holistic comfort in patients near end of life. Design: Psychometric study. The End of Life Comfort Questionnaire (EOLCQ) has 49 items with a six-response Likert type format, with higher scores indicating higher comfort. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The theory is designed for use by nurses in palliative and hospice care. The instruments were tested with 38 patient-family dyads. The Total Comfort (TC) Line was a ten-centimeter line having vertical orientation. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: needs of patients and family members, interventions (comfort measures), comfort, peaceful death, institutional integrity. [See &lt;www.uakron.edu/comfort. Methods: To test the theory, instruments were designed to measure comfort in patients and involved caregivers. The EOLCQ was administered one time to each patient and family member and the TC Line was administered twice with 20 minutes between each administration. Findings: Cronbach&rsquo;s alpha was .92 for patients and .89 for family members. Test-retest reliability for the TC Line was .77 for patients and .88 for family. For this group, 85% of the caregivers and 80% of the patients responded within one standard deviation (two centimeters) on the ten-centimeter line. Conclusions: The EOLCQ and TC Line have adequate psychometric properties for use in research with this population. The TC Line also is useful for clinical inquiries about patients and caregivers&rsquo; comfort. The question, &ldquo;How would you rate your comfort on a scale of one to ten, with ten being the lowest comfort?&rdquo; can elicit discussions about detractors from holistic comfort. Implications: Palliative care places a high priority on functional and psychological comfort for patients and family members. Applying the framework of comfort care will facilitate the achievement of the goals of palliative nursing. The instruments above are appropriate for testing the framework and the effectiveness of specific comfort measures.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:10:46Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:10:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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