Cross-cultural Comparisons of Factors Influencing Falls in Adults Over Sixty Five

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156831
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cross-cultural Comparisons of Factors Influencing Falls in Adults Over Sixty Five
Abstract:
Cross-cultural Comparisons of Factors Influencing Falls in Adults Over Sixty Five
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Komnenich, Pauline, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess physical factors related to fear of falling between two groups of community dwelling adults sixty-five and over, and to identify the usefulness of selected instruments in predicting the vulnerability of this age group to falls from a cross cultural perspective. Design: Descriptive Correlational. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: One hundred twenty nine community based adults over age sixty five representing two ethnic groups, eighty from Bosnia/Hercegovina and forty nine from the United States were assessed for risk of falling using three instruments: the Fast Evaluation of Mobility, Balance, and Fear (FEMBAF), the Folstein Mini-Mental Measurement Examination (MMSE) and the Falls Risk Questionnaire. These instruments are well established and are highly correlated in predicting falls in older adults. Risk factor assessment in this study was negatively correlated with the MMSE, positively correlated with the FEMBAF subscales and negatively correlated with the successful task completion scale. Concept or Variables Studied Together: Mobility, Balance, Fear of Falling and Risk Factors. Methods: Data collection included interviews and assessments using the three instruments. Interviews and assessments took approximately forty minutes to one hour. Permission to contact the participants was received through the senior centers or community contacts. The study was reviewed and approved by the institutional review committees in each University. Findings: There were no differences between the two groups on the Falls Risk Factor Assessment. However the Bosnian group scored higher on the MMSE and demonstrated less fear of falling and less mobility difficulty than the U.S. group. The Bosnian group also had a higher score for successful task completion than the U. S. group. Controlling for age using analysis of co-variance (ANCOVA), differences found between the two groups on the MMSE approached statistical significance p=.051, with alpha set a priori at .05 . The mobility difficulty score remained significant when controlling for age. The FEMBAF pain and successful completion task scores, although not statistically significant also approached significance, which may be clinically and culturally relevant. Diagnoses and occupational history were also collected and will be discussed in the paper as relevant to the above findings. Participants in this study will continue to be followed over time to evaluate the usefulness of these instruments in predicting falls. Conclusions: Conclusions from these findings suggest that there are differences between the two groups, which may be related to geography and life style events. Implications: Implications from this study provide baseline data for exploring the usefulness of the selected instruments in evaluating fall factors cross-culturally. Finding simple instruments that are useful and practical in assessing vulnerability to falls can assist nursing and medical practitioners in providing better anticipatory health care to older adults.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCross-cultural Comparisons of Factors Influencing Falls in Adults Over Sixty Fiveen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156831-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cross-cultural Comparisons of Factors Influencing Falls in Adults Over Sixty Five</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Komnenich, Pauline, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">paulina@asu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess physical factors related to fear of falling between two groups of community dwelling adults sixty-five and over, and to identify the usefulness of selected instruments in predicting the vulnerability of this age group to falls from a cross cultural perspective. Design: Descriptive Correlational. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: One hundred twenty nine community based adults over age sixty five representing two ethnic groups, eighty from Bosnia/Hercegovina and forty nine from the United States were assessed for risk of falling using three instruments: the Fast Evaluation of Mobility, Balance, and Fear (FEMBAF), the Folstein Mini-Mental Measurement Examination (MMSE) and the Falls Risk Questionnaire. These instruments are well established and are highly correlated in predicting falls in older adults. Risk factor assessment in this study was negatively correlated with the MMSE, positively correlated with the FEMBAF subscales and negatively correlated with the successful task completion scale. Concept or Variables Studied Together: Mobility, Balance, Fear of Falling and Risk Factors. Methods: Data collection included interviews and assessments using the three instruments. Interviews and assessments took approximately forty minutes to one hour. Permission to contact the participants was received through the senior centers or community contacts. The study was reviewed and approved by the institutional review committees in each University. Findings: There were no differences between the two groups on the Falls Risk Factor Assessment. However the Bosnian group scored higher on the MMSE and demonstrated less fear of falling and less mobility difficulty than the U.S. group. The Bosnian group also had a higher score for successful task completion than the U. S. group. Controlling for age using analysis of co-variance (ANCOVA), differences found between the two groups on the MMSE approached statistical significance p=.051, with alpha set a priori at .05 . The mobility difficulty score remained significant when controlling for age. The FEMBAF pain and successful completion task scores, although not statistically significant also approached significance, which may be clinically and culturally relevant. Diagnoses and occupational history were also collected and will be discussed in the paper as relevant to the above findings. Participants in this study will continue to be followed over time to evaluate the usefulness of these instruments in predicting falls. Conclusions: Conclusions from these findings suggest that there are differences between the two groups, which may be related to geography and life style events. Implications: Implications from this study provide baseline data for exploring the usefulness of the selected instruments in evaluating fall factors cross-culturally. Finding simple instruments that are useful and practical in assessing vulnerability to falls can assist nursing and medical practitioners in providing better anticipatory health care to older adults.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:10:50Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:10:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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