Genetic and Environmental Influences on Symptoms of Problematic Involvement with Alcohol and Smoking Behaviors in Twins from the MIDUS Survey

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156832
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Genetic and Environmental Influences on Symptoms of Problematic Involvement with Alcohol and Smoking Behaviors in Twins from the MIDUS Survey
Abstract:
Genetic and Environmental Influences on Symptoms of Problematic Involvement with Alcohol and Smoking Behaviors in Twins from the MIDUS Survey
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Conference Date:July 10-12, 2003
Author:Hardie, Thomas, EdD, RN, CS, NP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Delaware
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Howard Moss, Kevin Lynch, Caryn Lerman
Objective: To quantify the contributions of genetic and environmental factors to symptoms of problematic involvement with alcohol and smoking behaviors. Design: Biometrical methods were used to analyze responses to alcohol and smoking-related survey questions from MZ/DZ twins. Data were analyzed to determine contributions of genetic, shared and unshared environmental factors to these behaviors. Sample: The sample included 998 twin pairs from the Midlife Development in the US (MIDUS) study. Respondents were a nationally representative sample of adults(25-74yrs). Findings: Biometrical analyses of alcohol problem symptoms indicated that genetics accounted for a sizable proportion of variance, with a heritability of 63% for “increased chances of harm from drinking”, a heritability of 51% for “drinking larger/longer than intended” and a heritability of 48% for “being under the effects/after effects of alcohol at work, school or while caring for children”. “Desire to use” and “emotional problems” were accountable only on the basis of environment factors. Results for smoking indicated a heritability of 76% for having “ever smoked on a regular basis”. Similarly, the heritability for “current regular smoking” was 73%. However, for “making a quit attempt” 99% of the variance was due to the environment, with no genetic influence. Conclusion: The findings demonstrate the etiological heterogeneity of symptoms of problematic alcohol involvement. Depending on the symptom, genetic and environmental factors differentially combine. For cigarette smoking, the analyses confirm and extend previous reports of the heritability of smoking behavior as approximately 70%. While these findings suggest the importance of genetic factors in smoking behavior, they also demonstrate the importance of environmental factors in attempts smoking cessation. Thus, clinical interventions, and public health efforts can have potentially potent effects on problematic involvement with alcohol and cigarette smoking through appropriate etiological targeting. This research was supported, in part, by at TTURC Grant from NCI and NIDA P5084718. <!--Abstract 13808 modified by 130.91.62.213 on 11-5-2002-->
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Jul-2003
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGenetic and Environmental Influences on Symptoms of Problematic Involvement with Alcohol and Smoking Behaviors in Twins from the MIDUS Surveyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156832-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Genetic and Environmental Influences on Symptoms of Problematic Involvement with Alcohol and Smoking Behaviors in Twins from the MIDUS Survey</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 10-12, 2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hardie, Thomas, EdD, RN, CS, NP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Delaware</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">thardie@udel.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Howard Moss, Kevin Lynch, Caryn Lerman</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To quantify the contributions of genetic and environmental factors to symptoms of problematic involvement with alcohol and smoking behaviors. Design: Biometrical methods were used to analyze responses to alcohol and smoking-related survey questions from MZ/DZ twins. Data were analyzed to determine contributions of genetic, shared and unshared environmental factors to these behaviors. Sample: The sample included 998 twin pairs from the Midlife Development in the US (MIDUS) study. Respondents were a nationally representative sample of adults(25-74yrs). Findings: Biometrical analyses of alcohol problem symptoms indicated that genetics accounted for a sizable proportion of variance, with a heritability of 63% for &ldquo;increased chances of harm from drinking&rdquo;, a heritability of 51% for &ldquo;drinking larger/longer than intended&rdquo; and a heritability of 48% for &ldquo;being under the effects/after effects of alcohol at work, school or while caring for children&rdquo;. &ldquo;Desire to use&rdquo; and &ldquo;emotional problems&rdquo; were accountable only on the basis of environment factors. Results for smoking indicated a heritability of 76% for having &ldquo;ever smoked on a regular basis&rdquo;. Similarly, the heritability for &ldquo;current regular smoking&rdquo; was 73%. However, for &ldquo;making a quit attempt&rdquo; 99% of the variance was due to the environment, with no genetic influence. Conclusion: The findings demonstrate the etiological heterogeneity of symptoms of problematic alcohol involvement. Depending on the symptom, genetic and environmental factors differentially combine. For cigarette smoking, the analyses confirm and extend previous reports of the heritability of smoking behavior as approximately 70%. While these findings suggest the importance of genetic factors in smoking behavior, they also demonstrate the importance of environmental factors in attempts smoking cessation. Thus, clinical interventions, and public health efforts can have potentially potent effects on problematic involvement with alcohol and cigarette smoking through appropriate etiological targeting. This research was supported, in part, by at TTURC Grant from NCI and NIDA P5084718. &lt;!--Abstract 13808 modified by 130.91.62.213 on 11-5-2002--&gt;</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:10:54Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:10:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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