2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156835
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Qualitative Simulation and Team Development
Abstract:
Qualitative Simulation and Team Development
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Forsythe, Lydia L., PhD, MA, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Oklahoma University Medical Centers
Title:Vice President of Perioperative Services
[Research Presentation] Purpose: In healthcare professionals usually function in a time constrained paradigm due the nature of care delivery functions and due to the acute patient populations usually in need of emergent and urgent care, which leaves little, if no time for team reflection, or team processing as a collaborative action. Simulation can used to create a safe space as a structure for recognition and innovation to continue to develop a culture of safety for healthcare delivery and patient care. Methods: To create and develop a safe space four qualitative action research IRB approved studies were developed to explore team communication as an unfolding in the acute care environment of the operating room. In an effort to further develop a culture of safety the study participants used an action heuristic related to narrative in the form of collaborative recall and reflection to standardize task, process and language. Results: During the qualitative simulation events the team participants identified and changed multiple tasks, process and language items contributing to positive changes for task and efficiencies, team interactions and overall functionality of team processes. Conclusion: The studies demonstrated that simulation can be used in healthcare to develop safe spaces to practice, reflect, and develop collaborative relationships which contribute to the realization of a culture of safety.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQualitative Simulation and Team Developmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156835-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Qualitative Simulation and Team Development</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Forsythe, Lydia L., PhD, MA, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oklahoma University Medical Centers</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Vice President of Perioperative Services</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Londes@cs.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Purpose: In healthcare professionals usually function in a time constrained paradigm due the nature of care delivery functions and due to the acute patient populations usually in need of emergent and urgent care, which leaves little, if no time for team reflection, or team processing as a collaborative action. Simulation can used to create a safe space as a structure for recognition and innovation to continue to develop a culture of safety for healthcare delivery and patient care. Methods: To create and develop a safe space four qualitative action research IRB approved studies were developed to explore team communication as an unfolding in the acute care environment of the operating room. In an effort to further develop a culture of safety the study participants used an action heuristic related to narrative in the form of collaborative recall and reflection to standardize task, process and language. Results: During the qualitative simulation events the team participants identified and changed multiple tasks, process and language items contributing to positive changes for task and efficiencies, team interactions and overall functionality of team processes.&nbsp;Conclusion: The studies demonstrated that simulation can be used in healthcare to develop safe spaces to practice, reflect, and develop collaborative relationships which contribute to the realization of a culture of safety.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:11:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:11:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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