Outcomes of Home-Based Management Interventions for Community Dwelling Heart Failure Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156838
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Outcomes of Home-Based Management Interventions for Community Dwelling Heart Failure Patients
Abstract:
Outcomes of Home-Based Management Interventions for Community Dwelling Heart Failure Patients
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:LaFramboise, Louise
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: The goal of this longitudinal study was to examine the impact of different disease management interventions (telephonic, home visit, Health Buddy [computerized telephonic communication device], and combination home visit-Health Buddy) on patient and service outcomes in heart failure patients during the six months following entry into the study. Design: The design of this study is quasi-experimental with repeated measures. Subjects were assigned randomly to one of four disease management strategies. Following baseline measurement, outcomes on the dependent variables were measured at two, four, and six months. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The population consists of community-dwelling heart failure patients living in their own home or apartment in a Midwestern metropolitan area in the USA. The target sample for this study was 60 subjects recently dismissed from the hospital. Data collection is being completed by research nurses in the home of the subjects. Data collection for this two year study has been in progress for approximately 20 months. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: The purpose of this presentation is to consider the differences from baseline over six months in regard to symptom occurrence, functional status, health-related quality of life, and cost factors for heart failure patients receiving one of four disease management interventions. Methods: Group 1, received telephonic management, the standard care currently provided. Group 2 received five home visits by a nurse for assessment and education. Group 3 received assessment and education through the Health Buddy device. Group 4 received assessment and education through both home visits and the Health Buddy device. Data was collected in the following manner: the Cardiac Symptom Survey, a 40 item scale, assessed patients’ perception of frequency and severity of symptom occurrence and interference with physical activity and enjoyment of life. Functional status was measured with the Heart Failure Functional Status Inventory (25-item self-report questionnaire) and the 6-minute walk test (simple test in which patients walk as far as they can on a flat surface in six minutes). The Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (36-item multidimensional scale) measured health-related quality of life. Costs are quantified by number of emergency room visits and hospital readmission rate. Findings: To examine if there are differences among the disease management interventions on patient outcomes, repeated measures ANOVA and other descriptive and inferential statistics will be used. Conclusions: Conclusions will be drawn from the data and based on the research questions. Implications: The implications of this research program are cost-effective alternative strategies for managing heart failure patients in their homes. Innovative technology, like the Health Buddy device, can allow close subjective and objective monitoring while minimizing health care costs in terms of time and money. The Health Buddy provides daily monitoring of health care status and earlier intervention based on regular patient feedback.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOutcomes of Home-Based Management Interventions for Community Dwelling Heart Failure Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156838-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Outcomes of Home-Based Management Interventions for Community Dwelling Heart Failure Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">LaFramboise, Louise</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">llaframb@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The goal of this longitudinal study was to examine the impact of different disease management interventions (telephonic, home visit, Health Buddy [computerized telephonic communication device], and combination home visit-Health Buddy) on patient and service outcomes in heart failure patients during the six months following entry into the study. Design: The design of this study is quasi-experimental with repeated measures. Subjects were assigned randomly to one of four disease management strategies. Following baseline measurement, outcomes on the dependent variables were measured at two, four, and six months. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The population consists of community-dwelling heart failure patients living in their own home or apartment in a Midwestern metropolitan area in the USA. The target sample for this study was 60 subjects recently dismissed from the hospital. Data collection is being completed by research nurses in the home of the subjects. Data collection for this two year study has been in progress for approximately 20 months. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: The purpose of this presentation is to consider the differences from baseline over six months in regard to symptom occurrence, functional status, health-related quality of life, and cost factors for heart failure patients receiving one of four disease management interventions. Methods: Group 1, received telephonic management, the standard care currently provided. Group 2 received five home visits by a nurse for assessment and education. Group 3 received assessment and education through the Health Buddy device. Group 4 received assessment and education through both home visits and the Health Buddy device. Data was collected in the following manner: the Cardiac Symptom Survey, a 40 item scale, assessed patients&rsquo; perception of frequency and severity of symptom occurrence and interference with physical activity and enjoyment of life. Functional status was measured with the Heart Failure Functional Status Inventory (25-item self-report questionnaire) and the 6-minute walk test (simple test in which patients walk as far as they can on a flat surface in six minutes). The Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (36-item multidimensional scale) measured health-related quality of life. Costs are quantified by number of emergency room visits and hospital readmission rate. Findings: To examine if there are differences among the disease management interventions on patient outcomes, repeated measures ANOVA and other descriptive and inferential statistics will be used. Conclusions: Conclusions will be drawn from the data and based on the research questions. Implications: The implications of this research program are cost-effective alternative strategies for managing heart failure patients in their homes. Innovative technology, like the Health Buddy device, can allow close subjective and objective monitoring while minimizing health care costs in terms of time and money. The Health Buddy provides daily monitoring of health care status and earlier intervention based on regular patient feedback.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:11:17Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:11:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.