The Effects of Non-Nutritive Sucking on the Behavior Organization of Alzheimer’s Disease Patients in Terminal Stage

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156843
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Non-Nutritive Sucking on the Behavior Organization of Alzheimer’s Disease Patients in Terminal Stage
Abstract:
The Effects of Non-Nutritive Sucking on the Behavior Organization of Alzheimer’s Disease Patients in Terminal Stage
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Meeker, Mary
Objective: The objective of this intervention study was to examine whether or not non-nutritive sucking (NNS) improved the physiological indicators of behavior organization (heart rate, oxygen saturation levels and behavior state) of terminal stage Alzheimer’s disease patients residing in skilled nursing facilities during the morning care period. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The population consisted of patients diagnosed to be in the terminal stage of Alzheimer’s disease as documented on the Minimum Data Set and signed by a physician. The sample consisted of 38 subjects; the treatment group included 18 subjects (4 male, 14 female) and the control group included 20 subjects (3 male, 17 female). The setting involved eight, 125 bed skilled nursing facilities in the North-Central area of the United States. Intervention: The outcome variables included 8 double measures of heart rate, oxygen saturation levels, and behavior state (2 pretest measures, 2 during morning care, 2 after morning care and 2 posttest measures each 3 minutes apart). A pulse oximeter was used to measure heart rate and oxygen saturation levels. Behavior state was assessed using the Anderson Behavior State Scale. A toddler pacifier was the intervention used to assess non-nutritive sucking. Non-nutritive sucking was offered to the treatment group 3 minutes after the second during morning care measure. Methodology: This quasi-experimental study used a repeated measures mixed design with a no treatment control group. A Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) statistical procedure was used to test the effects of the non-nutritive sucking over time on the overall behavior outcomes of heart rate, oxygen saturation levels, and behavior state. Descriptive statistics were used to identify the sample. Findings: Findings of the MANOVA indicated statistically significant different means of group-by-group, group-by-time, and treatment-by-group-by-time on behavior organization as indicated by heart rate, oxygen saturation levels and behavior state. Conclusions: 1) The morning care period was found to be a stressor that lead to distress in terminal stage Alzheimer’s patients, 2) The sucking reflex was active in the 18 patients in the treatment group 3) Heart rate, oxygen saturation levels and behavior state were subject to change during a stressful period, 4) Terminal stage Alzheimer’s disease patients benefit physiologically from non-nutritive sucking, 5) Non-nutritive sucking reduced behavior disorganization by lowering heart rates, increasing oxygen saturation levels, and decreasing behavior state of the treatment group. Implications: 1) Results offer insight into the degree and patterns of stressful periods terminal stage Alzheimer’s disease patients experience, 2) Non-nutritive sucking is a cost effective, simple intervention that is effective in reducing stress and is easy to use, 3) Behavior organization indicators can be used to assess stress, fear, arousal, and discomfort.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Non-Nutritive Sucking on the Behavior Organization of Alzheimer’s Disease Patients in Terminal Stageen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156843-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of Non-Nutritive Sucking on the Behavior Organization of Alzheimer&rsquo;s Disease Patients in Terminal Stage</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Meeker, Mary</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mmeeker@walsh.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The objective of this intervention study was to examine whether or not non-nutritive sucking (NNS) improved the physiological indicators of behavior organization (heart rate, oxygen saturation levels and behavior state) of terminal stage Alzheimer&rsquo;s disease patients residing in skilled nursing facilities during the morning care period. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The population consisted of patients diagnosed to be in the terminal stage of Alzheimer&rsquo;s disease as documented on the Minimum Data Set and signed by a physician. The sample consisted of 38 subjects; the treatment group included 18 subjects (4 male, 14 female) and the control group included 20 subjects (3 male, 17 female). The setting involved eight, 125 bed skilled nursing facilities in the North-Central area of the United States. Intervention: The outcome variables included 8 double measures of heart rate, oxygen saturation levels, and behavior state (2 pretest measures, 2 during morning care, 2 after morning care and 2 posttest measures each 3 minutes apart). A pulse oximeter was used to measure heart rate and oxygen saturation levels. Behavior state was assessed using the Anderson Behavior State Scale. A toddler pacifier was the intervention used to assess non-nutritive sucking. Non-nutritive sucking was offered to the treatment group 3 minutes after the second during morning care measure. Methodology: This quasi-experimental study used a repeated measures mixed design with a no treatment control group. A Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) statistical procedure was used to test the effects of the non-nutritive sucking over time on the overall behavior outcomes of heart rate, oxygen saturation levels, and behavior state. Descriptive statistics were used to identify the sample. Findings: Findings of the MANOVA indicated statistically significant different means of group-by-group, group-by-time, and treatment-by-group-by-time on behavior organization as indicated by heart rate, oxygen saturation levels and behavior state. Conclusions: 1) The morning care period was found to be a stressor that lead to distress in terminal stage Alzheimer&rsquo;s patients, 2) The sucking reflex was active in the 18 patients in the treatment group 3) Heart rate, oxygen saturation levels and behavior state were subject to change during a stressful period, 4) Terminal stage Alzheimer&rsquo;s disease patients benefit physiologically from non-nutritive sucking, 5) Non-nutritive sucking reduced behavior disorganization by lowering heart rates, increasing oxygen saturation levels, and decreasing behavior state of the treatment group. Implications: 1) Results offer insight into the degree and patterns of stressful periods terminal stage Alzheimer&rsquo;s disease patients experience, 2) Non-nutritive sucking is a cost effective, simple intervention that is effective in reducing stress and is easy to use, 3) Behavior organization indicators can be used to assess stress, fear, arousal, and discomfort.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:11:36Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:11:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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