Developmental, Gender, and Ethnic Group Differences in Moods and Effects on Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Adolescents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156844
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Developmental, Gender, and Ethnic Group Differences in Moods and Effects on Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Adolescents
Abstract:
Developmental, Gender, and Ethnic Group Differences in Moods and Effects on Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Meininger, Janet
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center
Objective: The purposes of this study were to: 1) estimate the prevalence of mood states in adolescents; 2) test for maturation, ethnic group, and gender differences in the prevalence of mood states; and 3) investigate the relationships between mood states and ambulatory blood pressure measured during the course of daily activities. Design: Observational study with repeated-measures of ambulatory blood pressure. Population, Sample, Setting: The target population was healthy adolescents 11 to 16 years old residing in a large, metropolitan city in southeast Texas, U.S. A stratified quota sample of 371 adolescents was recruited from public middle and high schools. Stratification factors were gender, ethnic group (African-, European-, and Hispanic-American), and age. Variables: The dependent variables, systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure, were measured with an ambulatory monitor (Spacelabs 90207). These measurements, taken every 30 minutes during the day, were synchronized with activity monitoring (Motionlogger actigraph). Moods, time of day, position, and location were recorded by the participant each time blood pressure was measured during waking hours using a checklist format. Height and sexual maturation (Tanner ratings) were measured during a physical exam. Methods: For each participant, ambulatory blood pressures and moods were monitored for a 24-hour interval on a school day. The physical exam was conducted by a nurse practitioner on a different school day. Mixed-effects models for repeated measurements were used for statistical analyses. Findings: Positive and neutral moods were more prevalent than negative moods. There were statistically significant (p< .05) differences in prevalence of moods by gender, ethnic group, or maturation for all moods (stressed, sad, rushed, irritable, interested, bored, accomplishing things, neutral, excited) except feeling angry, happy, or relaxed. Feelings of being rushed, excited, happy and angry were associated with higher SBP; relaxed, bored and a sense of accomplishing things were associated with lower SBP. Excited and happy feelings were associated with higher DBP; feeling bored, interested and a sense of accomplishing things were associated with lower DBP (all p< .05). Conclusions: Although the effect sizes were small (0.5 to 2.0 mm Hg), adolescent moods were significantly related to increases and decreases in blood pressure. More physically mature adolescents had a higher prevalence of negative moods than less mature adolescents. Fewer differences in moods were noted in gender and ethnic group comparisons. Implications: When using ambulatory blood pressure as an outcome variable, the findings of this study underscore the importance of controlling for time-dependent covariates such as position and activity at the time of each blood pressure measurement. Links between adolescents’ blood pressures and their moods provide a basis for designing psychosocial interventions to complement standard cardiovascular prevention strategies.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopmental, Gender, and Ethnic Group Differences in Moods and Effects on Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156844-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Developmental, Gender, and Ethnic Group Differences in Moods and Effects on Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Adolescents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Meininger, Janet</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jmeining@son1.nur.uth.tmc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purposes of this study were to: 1) estimate the prevalence of mood states in adolescents; 2) test for maturation, ethnic group, and gender differences in the prevalence of mood states; and 3) investigate the relationships between mood states and ambulatory blood pressure measured during the course of daily activities. Design: Observational study with repeated-measures of ambulatory blood pressure. Population, Sample, Setting: The target population was healthy adolescents 11 to 16 years old residing in a large, metropolitan city in southeast Texas, U.S. A stratified quota sample of 371 adolescents was recruited from public middle and high schools. Stratification factors were gender, ethnic group (African-, European-, and Hispanic-American), and age. Variables: The dependent variables, systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure, were measured with an ambulatory monitor (Spacelabs 90207). These measurements, taken every 30 minutes during the day, were synchronized with activity monitoring (Motionlogger actigraph). Moods, time of day, position, and location were recorded by the participant each time blood pressure was measured during waking hours using a checklist format. Height and sexual maturation (Tanner ratings) were measured during a physical exam. Methods: For each participant, ambulatory blood pressures and moods were monitored for a 24-hour interval on a school day. The physical exam was conducted by a nurse practitioner on a different school day. Mixed-effects models for repeated measurements were used for statistical analyses. Findings: Positive and neutral moods were more prevalent than negative moods. There were statistically significant (p&lt; .05) differences in prevalence of moods by gender, ethnic group, or maturation for all moods (stressed, sad, rushed, irritable, interested, bored, accomplishing things, neutral, excited) except feeling angry, happy, or relaxed. Feelings of being rushed, excited, happy and angry were associated with higher SBP; relaxed, bored and a sense of accomplishing things were associated with lower SBP. Excited and happy feelings were associated with higher DBP; feeling bored, interested and a sense of accomplishing things were associated with lower DBP (all p&lt; .05). Conclusions: Although the effect sizes were small (0.5 to 2.0 mm Hg), adolescent moods were significantly related to increases and decreases in blood pressure. More physically mature adolescents had a higher prevalence of negative moods than less mature adolescents. Fewer differences in moods were noted in gender and ethnic group comparisons. Implications: When using ambulatory blood pressure as an outcome variable, the findings of this study underscore the importance of controlling for time-dependent covariates such as position and activity at the time of each blood pressure measurement. Links between adolescents&rsquo; blood pressures and their moods provide a basis for designing psychosocial interventions to complement standard cardiovascular prevention strategies.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:11:40Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:11:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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