Education for Evidence-Based Practice: Local, National and International Strategies

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156848
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Education for Evidence-Based Practice: Local, National and International Strategies
Abstract:
Education for Evidence-Based Practice: Local, National and International Strategies
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:McCaughan, Dorothy
P.I. Institution Name:University of York
Design: Survey and qualitative data collection. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Two international groups of nurses (n=25 and n=31) of nurses who attended two separate workshops in the UK on evidence based nursing in 1999 and 2000. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: The paper focuses on an evaluation of the courses by participants. Methods: A series of questionnaires administered to participants before, during and after the workshops. Findings: Participants displayed a wide variation in their motivation for attending the workshops and in their expectations of what the courses should deliver. During the workshops, there were marked differences in the level of engagement with the teaching and materials, at both the individual and group level. This resulted in teachers and facilitators exploring different techniques to promote interactive learning, some of which proved more successful than others. For the majority of participants, the most challenging aspect of the evidence-based process was the implementation of what they had learned on the course in their workplace setting. Conclusions: Participants clearly valued the experience of attending the workshops. For some, the most important aspect was the learning of new skills; others cited an increased confidence in the knowledge they already possessed. Talking to colleagues from difference countries and different work settings about shared goals and problems was perceived as beneficial by all. Changing the behavior of others was widely recognized as the biggest obstacle to achieving an evidence-based intervention. Implications: Those considering running a course in evidence based practice should seek detailed prior knowledge of participants' needs, should tailor the course to meet these specific needs in advance as far as possible and, finally, should be prepared to be flexible and adaptive in their approach to teaching.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEducation for Evidence-Based Practice: Local, National and International Strategiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156848-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Education for Evidence-Based Practice: Local, National and International Strategies</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McCaughan, Dorothy</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of York</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dmm5@york.ac.uk</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Design: Survey and qualitative data collection. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Two international groups of nurses (n=25 and n=31) of nurses who attended two separate workshops in the UK on evidence based nursing in 1999 and 2000. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: The paper focuses on an evaluation of the courses by participants. Methods: A series of questionnaires administered to participants before, during and after the workshops. Findings: Participants displayed a wide variation in their motivation for attending the workshops and in their expectations of what the courses should deliver. During the workshops, there were marked differences in the level of engagement with the teaching and materials, at both the individual and group level. This resulted in teachers and facilitators exploring different techniques to promote interactive learning, some of which proved more successful than others. For the majority of participants, the most challenging aspect of the evidence-based process was the implementation of what they had learned on the course in their workplace setting. Conclusions: Participants clearly valued the experience of attending the workshops. For some, the most important aspect was the learning of new skills; others cited an increased confidence in the knowledge they already possessed. Talking to colleagues from difference countries and different work settings about shared goals and problems was perceived as beneficial by all. Changing the behavior of others was widely recognized as the biggest obstacle to achieving an evidence-based intervention. Implications: Those considering running a course in evidence based practice should seek detailed prior knowledge of participants' needs, should tailor the course to meet these specific needs in advance as far as possible and, finally, should be prepared to be flexible and adaptive in their approach to teaching.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:11:54Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:11:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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