An Exploration of the Smoking Behavior and Attitudes of Lung Cancer Patients after Lobectomy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156851
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Exploration of the Smoking Behavior and Attitudes of Lung Cancer Patients after Lobectomy
Abstract:
An Exploration of the Smoking Behavior and Attitudes of Lung Cancer Patients after Lobectomy
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Salmon, Becky
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University Purdue University-Fort Wayne
Objective: In 1998, it was estimated that lung cancer caused 170,000 deaths in the United States. Smoking is a contributing factor in 80-85% of all lung cancer cases. Stage one-lung cancer patients have been diagnosed with a tumor that is confined to the lung. After lobectomy surgery to remove the tumor, no adjuvant therapy is received and patients are considered surgically cured. The purpose of this study was to describe the smoking behavior of individuals before and after being diagnosed with stage one lung cancer and after lobectomy. Design: A pilot study was conducted to describe the smoking behavior before and after diagnosis of stage one lung cancer and lobectomy. The design used for this study was ex-post facto, exploratory design. Bandura’s Social Learning Theory was the conceptual framework. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: A convenience sample of 40 male and female patients who had surgical resection of stage one lung cancer involved in a follow-up thoracic surgery program in a private cardiovascular and thoracic surgeons’ office. Twenty-six questionnaires were returned. Variables Studied: The independent variables included stage one lung cancer and previous smoking behavior. The dependant variables included current smoking behaviors, attitudes toward smoking and motivators to quit smoking. Methods: Questionnaires with multiple-choice questions eliciting demographic and quantitative data regarding smoking behaviors and three qualitative questions regarding feelings toward smoking prior to, during and after the diagnosis of lung cancer were mailed to individuals in the sample. Quantitative data was analyzed using SPSS statistical data analysis program. Qualitative data was analyzed using content analysis. Findings: Individuals started smoking during teen years (Mean age: 16.5). 100% of peers smoked when individuals started smoking. 85% of individuals, who quit, did so on their own without any adjuvant therapy. Prior to the diagnosis of lung cancer, 66% of individuals felt positively toward smoking. After the diagnosis of lung cancer, 66% of individuals felt negatively toward smoking and those feelings became stronger and more negative with time. Conclusions: Teen years remain the prime time for individuals to start smoking. Peer pressure remains an important motivator to smoke. Individual desire to quit remains a strong motivator for smoking cessation. Individual attitudes changed from mostly positive to mostly negative after lung cancer surgery. Implications: The implications of this study can be utilized in a variety of clinical settings. Nurses need to continue to educate and counsel teenagers and their parents and current smokers on the dangers of smoking. Further research on preventing the initiating of smoking and facilitating smoking cessation needs to be explored.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Exploration of the Smoking Behavior and Attitudes of Lung Cancer Patients after Lobectomyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156851-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Exploration of the Smoking Behavior and Attitudes of Lung Cancer Patients after Lobectomy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Salmon, Becky</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University Purdue University-Fort Wayne</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">salmonb@ipfw.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: In 1998, it was estimated that lung cancer caused 170,000 deaths in the United States. Smoking is a contributing factor in 80-85% of all lung cancer cases. Stage one-lung cancer patients have been diagnosed with a tumor that is confined to the lung. After lobectomy surgery to remove the tumor, no adjuvant therapy is received and patients are considered surgically cured. The purpose of this study was to describe the smoking behavior of individuals before and after being diagnosed with stage one lung cancer and after lobectomy. Design: A pilot study was conducted to describe the smoking behavior before and after diagnosis of stage one lung cancer and lobectomy. The design used for this study was ex-post facto, exploratory design. Bandura&rsquo;s Social Learning Theory was the conceptual framework. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: A convenience sample of 40 male and female patients who had surgical resection of stage one lung cancer involved in a follow-up thoracic surgery program in a private cardiovascular and thoracic surgeons&rsquo; office. Twenty-six questionnaires were returned. Variables Studied: The independent variables included stage one lung cancer and previous smoking behavior. The dependant variables included current smoking behaviors, attitudes toward smoking and motivators to quit smoking. Methods: Questionnaires with multiple-choice questions eliciting demographic and quantitative data regarding smoking behaviors and three qualitative questions regarding feelings toward smoking prior to, during and after the diagnosis of lung cancer were mailed to individuals in the sample. Quantitative data was analyzed using SPSS statistical data analysis program. Qualitative data was analyzed using content analysis. Findings: Individuals started smoking during teen years (Mean age: 16.5). 100% of peers smoked when individuals started smoking. 85% of individuals, who quit, did so on their own without any adjuvant therapy. Prior to the diagnosis of lung cancer, 66% of individuals felt positively toward smoking. After the diagnosis of lung cancer, 66% of individuals felt negatively toward smoking and those feelings became stronger and more negative with time. Conclusions: Teen years remain the prime time for individuals to start smoking. Peer pressure remains an important motivator to smoke. Individual desire to quit remains a strong motivator for smoking cessation. Individual attitudes changed from mostly positive to mostly negative after lung cancer surgery. Implications: The implications of this study can be utilized in a variety of clinical settings. Nurses need to continue to educate and counsel teenagers and their parents and current smokers on the dangers of smoking. Further research on preventing the initiating of smoking and facilitating smoking cessation needs to be explored.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:12:06Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:12:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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