Incidence and Correlates of Violence among HIV-Infected Women in the Southeastern United States Who are at High Risk of Becoming Pregnant

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156852
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Incidence and Correlates of Violence among HIV-Infected Women in the Southeastern United States Who are at High Risk of Becoming Pregnant
Abstract:
Incidence and Correlates of Violence among HIV-Infected Women in the Southeastern United States Who are at High Risk of Becoming Pregnant
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Sowell, Richard, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of South Carolina-Columbia
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: There is growing recognition internationally of the problem of violence against women. Women who are at high risk for pregnancy and/or HIV infected may be at particular risk for intimate partner or family violence. The purpose of this study was to estimate the incidence and to identify the correlates of physical and sexual violence among HIV-infected women at increased risk of pregnancy. Design: This descriptive study used cross-sectional data collected at data point one within a 3-year longitudinal study of reproductive decision-making. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The sample for this analysis consisted of 275 HIV-infected women at increased risk for pregnancy who lived in the southern United States. Women participating in the study were predominantly African-American (87%), single (82%), with an annual household income less than $10,000 (66%). Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Physical and sexual violence, HIV-infected women, life circumstances and life satisfaction. Methods: Study data was collected through face-to-face interviews. Female research assistants trained in interviewing techniques read questions to women and completed the study questionnaires. Incidences of violence were examined using descriptive statistics. Logistic regression was used to identify correlates of violence against the women. Findings: Overall 68% of the women reported experiencing physical (59%) and/or sexual (52%) violence. Women who reported greater lifetime physical and sexual violence were more likely to have disclosed their HIV seropositive status to their current sex partner. Results of logistic regression revealed that greater intent to get pregnant (OR=0.933), decreased life satisfaction (OR=1.048), having three or more children (OR=0.474), and history of drug use (OR=0.794) significantly distinguished between women who reported violence and those who did not. Conclusions: HIV-infected women in this study reported high levels of physical and sexual violence. A history of violence before HIV infection was predictive of violence after infection. The fact that women reporting higher levels of violence had more children and had greater intent to get pregnant suggests that women incorrectly perceive that childbearing may give them someone to love or improve their situation. Implications: HIV-infected women are at high risk for experiencing violence in their lives. Clinicians need to routinely assess for such violence since it can affect their ability and willingness to receive treatment, as well as directly, adversely influencing their health and well being.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIncidence and Correlates of Violence among HIV-Infected Women in the Southeastern United States Who are at High Risk of Becoming Pregnanten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156852-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Incidence and Correlates of Violence among HIV-Infected Women in the Southeastern United States Who are at High Risk of Becoming Pregnant</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sowell, Richard, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of South Carolina-Columbia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">richard.sowell@sc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: There is growing recognition internationally of the problem of violence against women. Women who are at high risk for pregnancy and/or HIV infected may be at particular risk for intimate partner or family violence. The purpose of this study was to estimate the incidence and to identify the correlates of physical and sexual violence among HIV-infected women at increased risk of pregnancy. Design: This descriptive study used cross-sectional data collected at data point one within a 3-year longitudinal study of reproductive decision-making. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The sample for this analysis consisted of 275 HIV-infected women at increased risk for pregnancy who lived in the southern United States. Women participating in the study were predominantly African-American (87%), single (82%), with an annual household income less than $10,000 (66%). Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Physical and sexual violence, HIV-infected women, life circumstances and life satisfaction. Methods: Study data was collected through face-to-face interviews. Female research assistants trained in interviewing techniques read questions to women and completed the study questionnaires. Incidences of violence were examined using descriptive statistics. Logistic regression was used to identify correlates of violence against the women. Findings: Overall 68% of the women reported experiencing physical (59%) and/or sexual (52%) violence. Women who reported greater lifetime physical and sexual violence were more likely to have disclosed their HIV seropositive status to their current sex partner. Results of logistic regression revealed that greater intent to get pregnant (OR=0.933), decreased life satisfaction (OR=1.048), having three or more children (OR=0.474), and history of drug use (OR=0.794) significantly distinguished between women who reported violence and those who did not. Conclusions: HIV-infected women in this study reported high levels of physical and sexual violence. A history of violence before HIV infection was predictive of violence after infection. The fact that women reporting higher levels of violence had more children and had greater intent to get pregnant suggests that women incorrectly perceive that childbearing may give them someone to love or improve their situation. Implications: HIV-infected women are at high risk for experiencing violence in their lives. Clinicians need to routinely assess for such violence since it can affect their ability and willingness to receive treatment, as well as directly, adversely influencing their health and well being.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:12:09Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:12:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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