2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156853
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The HEALTH Traditions Quilt
Abstract:
The HEALTH Traditions Quilt
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Spector, Rachel
P.I. Institution Name:Boston College
Objective: The objective of this poster is to display the findings of an ongoing research endeavor that has been designed to: a. develop a model that explains methods of maintaining, protecting and/or restoring health (defined herein as the balance of the person, both within one's being - physical, mental, and spiritual; and in the outside world - natural, familial and community, and metaphysical); b. collect, categorize, and photograph objects that are used to maintain, protect, and/or restore health; and traditional childbearing, death related and healing objects that have been gathered from selected ethno-cultural traditions. Design: Exploratory, descriptive - interviews and literature resources from anthropology, folklore, history, and sociology have been used to verify the origins and/or use of the selected objects. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The population has consisted of informants who are knowledgeable in traditional health and illness beliefs and practices world-wide. The items and the information related to them has been acquired over a twenty-five year span of time. Variables Studied: The variables studied include seeking the answers to the following questions: "What do you do, or what objects do you use, within your traditional culture or religion to preserve, protect, and/or restore your health?" “What do you do, or what objects do you use, at critical moments of life - birth and death?" Methods: Items have been collected in various venues world-wide and categorized for the past twenty-five years; selected items have been photographed and documented for this display. The theoretical HEALTH Traditions Model is included on the poster. Findings: This ongoing endeavor has yielded a wealth of items and stories related to traditional health, birth and death beliefs and practices worldwide. Conclusions: This HEALTH Traditions "quilt" has been created to awaken the viewer to the richness of how people from within a given traditional heritage may respond to the research questions stated earlier. The symbolism inherent in the health beliefs of people from many international traditions are included. The "quilt" also serves as a vehicle to portray this rich array of images because quilts are creative art forms that relate the traditions and stories of the people who make them; they are invaluable objects in homes. The creation of a quilt is a compelling undertaking - it is both challenging and relaxing. The completed quilt provides protection, warmth, and comfort. The twelve panels depict images representative of: acculturation and assimilation; allopathic health care; Americana - Patent Medicines; birth; death; healing; and American Indian, African-, Asian-, European- and Hispanic American HEALTH Traditions. Implications: This "quilt" serves as a medium for the rich information as it richly portrays and illustrates the beauty and diversity of traditional global health beliefs and practices. Given the demographic changes that are occurring globally, it serves as a helpful tool for engaging the philosophical discussions of traditional health practices.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe HEALTH Traditions Quilten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156853-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The HEALTH Traditions Quilt</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Spector, Rachel</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Boston College</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rachel.spector.1@bc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The objective of this poster is to display the findings of an ongoing research endeavor that has been designed to: a. develop a model that explains methods of maintaining, protecting and/or restoring health (defined herein as the balance of the person, both within one's being - physical, mental, and spiritual; and in the outside world - natural, familial and community, and metaphysical); b. collect, categorize, and photograph objects that are used to maintain, protect, and/or restore health; and traditional childbearing, death related and healing objects that have been gathered from selected ethno-cultural traditions. Design: Exploratory, descriptive - interviews and literature resources from anthropology, folklore, history, and sociology have been used to verify the origins and/or use of the selected objects. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The population has consisted of informants who are knowledgeable in traditional health and illness beliefs and practices world-wide. The items and the information related to them has been acquired over a twenty-five year span of time. Variables Studied: The variables studied include seeking the answers to the following questions: &quot;What do you do, or what objects do you use, within your traditional culture or religion to preserve, protect, and/or restore your health?&quot; &ldquo;What do you do, or what objects do you use, at critical moments of life - birth and death?&quot; Methods: Items have been collected in various venues world-wide and categorized for the past twenty-five years; selected items have been photographed and documented for this display. The theoretical HEALTH Traditions Model is included on the poster. Findings: This ongoing endeavor has yielded a wealth of items and stories related to traditional health, birth and death beliefs and practices worldwide. Conclusions: This HEALTH Traditions &quot;quilt&quot; has been created to awaken the viewer to the richness of how people from within a given traditional heritage may respond to the research questions stated earlier. The symbolism inherent in the health beliefs of people from many international traditions are included. The &quot;quilt&quot; also serves as a vehicle to portray this rich array of images because quilts are creative art forms that relate the traditions and stories of the people who make them; they are invaluable objects in homes. The creation of a quilt is a compelling undertaking - it is both challenging and relaxing. The completed quilt provides protection, warmth, and comfort. The twelve panels depict images representative of: acculturation and assimilation; allopathic health care; Americana - Patent Medicines; birth; death; healing; and American Indian, African-, Asian-, European- and Hispanic American HEALTH Traditions. Implications: This &quot;quilt&quot; serves as a medium for the rich information as it richly portrays and illustrates the beauty and diversity of traditional global health beliefs and practices. Given the demographic changes that are occurring globally, it serves as a helpful tool for engaging the philosophical discussions of traditional health practices.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:12:13Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:12:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.