Medicinal Substance Use of Independent Living Frail Older Adults in South Florida

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156854
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Medicinal Substance Use of Independent Living Frail Older Adults in South Florida
Abstract:
Medicinal Substance Use of Independent Living Frail Older Adults in South Florida
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Stitt, Nancy
P.I. Institution Name:Compass Health Systems
Objective: The study examined the medicinal substance use of frail independent older adults. Design: A descriptive research design was used in this exploratory study. Data was obtained through face-to-face interviews that took place in the participant’s home. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The population for the study consisted of frail independent older adults who were receiving home health nursing care in their own or family’s home through the Channeling Project. Eligibility criteria included (a) taking one or more medicinal substances, (b) 65 years of age or older, (c) living independently in their own or family’s home, (d) needing assistance with three or more activities of daily living (ADL’s), (e) having the responsibility for obtaining and administering their own medicinal substances, (f) able to speak and understand English, and (g) willing to participate in the study. Thirty subjects who met the study criteria were recruited from the available patient case load of the Channeling Project whose goal is to maintain frail older adults in the community for as long as feasible. Concept or Variables Studied: Medicinal substances were defined as any prescription; over-the-counter; vitamin, mineral, or supplement; herbal; functional food; or home remedy taken to achieve a therapeutic effect. Methods: Participants were informed of the purpose of the study and their rights as human subjects in research. After participants agreed to and signed an informed consent, an appointment was made at the participants’ convenience for the interview to take place. Data were collected using the Medicinal Substance Interview Guide, developed by the researchers, that collected the following information: (a) name of substance taken, (b) amount (dosage) of substance taken, (c) when it was taken, and (d) reason for taking the substance. These data were collected for all categories of medicinal substances: prescription; over-the-counter; vitamin, mineral, supplement; herbal, functional food; or home remedy. Participants were asked to show the containers of the substances so that prescribed or recommended dosage could be compared with the actual stated amount taken. Findings: Of the 30 participants, (a) 100% took at least two prescription drugs, the mean number of prescription drugs taken was 7.3; (b) 100% took at least one over-the-counter drug, the mean number of over-the-counter drugs was 2; (c) 50% took at least one vitamin, mineral, or supplement; (d) 23.3% took herbal medicines, the mean number of herbals was 0.4; (e) 43% reported taking functional foods, the mean number of functional foods was 0.6; and (d) the total mean for all medicinal categories combined was 12.7. Conclusions: The data indicate that 93.3% of the participants met the definition of polypharmacy, that is, taking three or more prescription drugs. This suggests that all participants were at risk for adverse effects. Taking this amount of medicinal substances places the older adult at risk for non-adherence to health promoting medicinal regimens. Implications: The data from this study indicates the importance of nurses and other primary health care providers obtaining thorough medication histories. Such histories should not be limited to prescription and over-the-counter drugs, but should also include herbal remedies; vitamins, minerals, and supplements; functional foods; and other home remedies taken to achieve a therapeutic purpose.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMedicinal Substance Use of Independent Living Frail Older Adults in South Floridaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156854-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Medicinal Substance Use of Independent Living Frail Older Adults in South Florida</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stitt, Nancy</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Compass Health Systems</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">janasiak@mindspring.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The study examined the medicinal substance use of frail independent older adults. Design: A descriptive research design was used in this exploratory study. Data was obtained through face-to-face interviews that took place in the participant&rsquo;s home. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The population for the study consisted of frail independent older adults who were receiving home health nursing care in their own or family&rsquo;s home through the Channeling Project. Eligibility criteria included (a) taking one or more medicinal substances, (b) 65 years of age or older, (c) living independently in their own or family&rsquo;s home, (d) needing assistance with three or more activities of daily living (ADL&rsquo;s), (e) having the responsibility for obtaining and administering their own medicinal substances, (f) able to speak and understand English, and (g) willing to participate in the study. Thirty subjects who met the study criteria were recruited from the available patient case load of the Channeling Project whose goal is to maintain frail older adults in the community for as long as feasible. Concept or Variables Studied: Medicinal substances were defined as any prescription; over-the-counter; vitamin, mineral, or supplement; herbal; functional food; or home remedy taken to achieve a therapeutic effect. Methods: Participants were informed of the purpose of the study and their rights as human subjects in research. After participants agreed to and signed an informed consent, an appointment was made at the participants&rsquo; convenience for the interview to take place. Data were collected using the Medicinal Substance Interview Guide, developed by the researchers, that collected the following information: (a) name of substance taken, (b) amount (dosage) of substance taken, (c) when it was taken, and (d) reason for taking the substance. These data were collected for all categories of medicinal substances: prescription; over-the-counter; vitamin, mineral, supplement; herbal, functional food; or home remedy. Participants were asked to show the containers of the substances so that prescribed or recommended dosage could be compared with the actual stated amount taken. Findings: Of the 30 participants, (a) 100% took at least two prescription drugs, the mean number of prescription drugs taken was 7.3; (b) 100% took at least one over-the-counter drug, the mean number of over-the-counter drugs was 2; (c) 50% took at least one vitamin, mineral, or supplement; (d) 23.3% took herbal medicines, the mean number of herbals was 0.4; (e) 43% reported taking functional foods, the mean number of functional foods was 0.6; and (d) the total mean for all medicinal categories combined was 12.7. Conclusions: The data indicate that 93.3% of the participants met the definition of polypharmacy, that is, taking three or more prescription drugs. This suggests that all participants were at risk for adverse effects. Taking this amount of medicinal substances places the older adult at risk for non-adherence to health promoting medicinal regimens. Implications: The data from this study indicates the importance of nurses and other primary health care providers obtaining thorough medication histories. Such histories should not be limited to prescription and over-the-counter drugs, but should also include herbal remedies; vitamins, minerals, and supplements; functional foods; and other home remedies taken to achieve a therapeutic purpose.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:12:16Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:12:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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