Gender Differences in Use of Exercise Processes of Change in Elders Residing in Assisted Living Facilities

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156855
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Gender Differences in Use of Exercise Processes of Change in Elders Residing in Assisted Living Facilities
Abstract:
Gender Differences in Use of Exercise Processes of Change in Elders Residing in Assisted Living Facilities
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Tseng, Yueh-Hsia
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Objective: Increasing exercise behavior of elders is a major health goal. One model, the Transtheoretical Model (TM) (Prochaska & Diclemente, 1982), has been used to understand and increase exercise behavior. The purpose of this study is to compare the differences between female and male elders residing in assisted living facilities (ALFs) on their use of the 10 processes of change and the degree to which elders engage in active exercise. Design: A cross-sectional comparative design was used. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The study sample was elders residing in six randomly selected ALFs in a large metropolitan area in the US. A convenience sample of 110 females and 44 males (ages from 65 to 99 years old with a mean of 84 years) was recruited. The study was completed in May 2000. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: The variables studied were gender and exercise stages of change and exercise processes of change of the TM. Methods: After the study was explained and written consent was obtained, the subject was interviewed face-to-face in a place he/she selected. The investigator read all of the items on Exercise Stages of Change Questionnaire (Marcus & Simkin, 1993) and Exercise Processes Questionnaire (Marcus, Rossi, et al., 1992) to the subject and marked the answers. Findings: The Spearman's rank order correlation test indicated that educational level and stages of change were not correlated with gender. The t-test and Mann-Whitney tests revealed that age (p = .02) and perceived health status (p = .026) were slightly different in female and male groups. The results of the Kruskal-Wallis tests indicated that all 10 processes change in the female group were significant at differentiating stages of change (ps <.05), while only five processes of change in the male group were significant. The results of the Mann-Whitney tests for pair comparison revealed that both female and male elders who engaged in exercise continued to seek out information about exercise, reappraised their value system with respect to the role of exercise, made commitment to change sedentary lifestyle, were more willing to change factors that control inactive behavior, and had a substitution of alternative behaviors for inactivity (ps < .005). Female elders, however, who engaged in exercise had more emotional experiences related to exercise, believed inactivity affected their physical and social environments, used more support from others to participate in exercise, were more aware of the availability of alternative problem-free lifestyles, and had more control on situations which triggered inactivity while male elders who engaged in exercise did not use these processes. Conclusions: The findings of this study support the applicability of the TM to increase exercise behavior for elders residing in ALFs. Female elders used more types of processes of change to engage in exercise. Implications: The findings of this study can give guidance to develop gender specific interventions to increase exercise behavior of elders who are at different stages of change regarding exercise. For example, the process of helping relationships should be used in planning exercise programs for older women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGender Differences in Use of Exercise Processes of Change in Elders Residing in Assisted Living Facilitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156855-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Gender Differences in Use of Exercise Processes of Change in Elders Residing in Assisted Living Facilities</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tseng, Yueh-Hsia</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yhtseng@mercury.csmc.edu.tw</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Increasing exercise behavior of elders is a major health goal. One model, the Transtheoretical Model (TM) (Prochaska &amp; Diclemente, 1982), has been used to understand and increase exercise behavior. The purpose of this study is to compare the differences between female and male elders residing in assisted living facilities (ALFs) on their use of the 10 processes of change and the degree to which elders engage in active exercise. Design: A cross-sectional comparative design was used. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The study sample was elders residing in six randomly selected ALFs in a large metropolitan area in the US. A convenience sample of 110 females and 44 males (ages from 65 to 99 years old with a mean of 84 years) was recruited. The study was completed in May 2000. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: The variables studied were gender and exercise stages of change and exercise processes of change of the TM. Methods: After the study was explained and written consent was obtained, the subject was interviewed face-to-face in a place he/she selected. The investigator read all of the items on Exercise Stages of Change Questionnaire (Marcus &amp; Simkin, 1993) and Exercise Processes Questionnaire (Marcus, Rossi, et al., 1992) to the subject and marked the answers. Findings: The Spearman's rank order correlation test indicated that educational level and stages of change were not correlated with gender. The t-test and Mann-Whitney tests revealed that age (p = .02) and perceived health status (p = .026) were slightly different in female and male groups. The results of the Kruskal-Wallis tests indicated that all 10 processes change in the female group were significant at differentiating stages of change (ps &lt;.05), while only five processes of change in the male group were significant. The results of the Mann-Whitney tests for pair comparison revealed that both female and male elders who engaged in exercise continued to seek out information about exercise, reappraised their value system with respect to the role of exercise, made commitment to change sedentary lifestyle, were more willing to change factors that control inactive behavior, and had a substitution of alternative behaviors for inactivity (ps &lt; .005). Female elders, however, who engaged in exercise had more emotional experiences related to exercise, believed inactivity affected their physical and social environments, used more support from others to participate in exercise, were more aware of the availability of alternative problem-free lifestyles, and had more control on situations which triggered inactivity while male elders who engaged in exercise did not use these processes. Conclusions: The findings of this study support the applicability of the TM to increase exercise behavior for elders residing in ALFs. Female elders used more types of processes of change to engage in exercise. Implications: The findings of this study can give guidance to develop gender specific interventions to increase exercise behavior of elders who are at different stages of change regarding exercise. For example, the process of helping relationships should be used in planning exercise programs for older women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:12:20Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:12:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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