In Search of Resilience: A Test of a Theoretical Model in a Sample of Children with Asthma

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156858
Type:
Presentation
Title:
In Search of Resilience: A Test of a Theoretical Model in a Sample of Children with Asthma
Abstract:
In Search of Resilience: A Test of a Theoretical Model in a Sample of Children with Asthma
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Vinson, Judith, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:South Dakota State University
Title:Undergraduate Nursing Department Head
Objective: To test a model of resilience in children developed from theoretical and research literature using theories of ecology of human development, salutogensis, stress and coping, quality of life, and illness indices. This study was undertaken to provide information about the relationships among characteristics of children with asthma and their families and the management of asthma symptoms. Design: A correlational survey design was employed using six research instruments and identified illness indices to determine relationships among the study variables. A nonprobability, volunteer sampling was used because of the voluntary nature of the subject participation in the study. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Nearly 5 million children are diagnosed with asthma in the United States. Increasing asthma mortality and morbidity place children at risk. Resilience provides an understanding of individual variation in human behavioral responses within the context of environments filled with risk, adversity, and challenge. Data were collected from a sample of 235 children with asthma, aged 7 to 12 years, and a parent of each child in one of three settings: hospital-based pulmonary and allergy clinic, an office of a private pediatric allergist, and a summer camp specifically for school-aged children. The dates of collection were from July through October 1996. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: The exogenous construct Family was measured by the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Scale (FACES II) which assesses two dimensions of family: (a) family cohesion and (b) family adaptability (flexibility). The endogenous construct Child was measured by two instruments: Child Sense of Coherence Scale (CSOC) and a Self-Esteem Inventory. The endogenous construct Appraisal was measured by a child’s version of an adult asthma symptom checklist. The endogenous construct Coping was measured by the Coping Health Inventory for Children (CHIC) that assesses five subscales that indicate coping patterns. The outcome variables were Quality of Life and Illness Indices. The Asthma Pediatric Quality of Life Questionnaire, that assesses three domains experienced by children with asthma, measured Quality of Life. Illness indices were measured by the number of days hospitalized, the number of days missed from school, and the number of emergency room visits, all due to asthma in the 3 months preceding the study interview. Methods: Data collected from telephone interviews with a parent of each child and a personal interview with each child (n=235) were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Findings: The results indicated six significant paths between the constructs family adaptability and cohesiveness, child self-esteem and sense of coherence, threat appraisal, coping styles, perceived quality of life, and asthma illness indices. Analysis revealed a goodness-of-fit index of 0.89. Fifteen percent of the variance of illness was explained by family functioning, specific child characteristics, appraisal and coping, and perceived quality of life. Conclusions: A theoretical model of resilience in children managing a health condition was developed and tested in a sample of children. The findings of this study contribute knowledge concerning the nature and dimensions of childhood resilience. This knowledge is highly relevant to professional nursing practice. Implications: Nurses who specialize in the care of children are well aware of the high prevalence rate of asthma. The findings should enable these nurses to identify the variables and visualize the paths by which children can be helped to manage asthma symptoms successfully. Also, a theoretical model of resilience in children managing a health condition has been proposed for further testing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIn Search of Resilience: A Test of a Theoretical Model in a Sample of Children with Asthmaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156858-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">In Search of Resilience: A Test of a Theoretical Model in a Sample of Children with Asthma</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vinson, Judith, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">South Dakota State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Undergraduate Nursing Department Head</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">judith_vinson@sdstate.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To test a model of resilience in children developed from theoretical and research literature using theories of ecology of human development, salutogensis, stress and coping, quality of life, and illness indices. This study was undertaken to provide information about the relationships among characteristics of children with asthma and their families and the management of asthma symptoms. Design: A correlational survey design was employed using six research instruments and identified illness indices to determine relationships among the study variables. A nonprobability, volunteer sampling was used because of the voluntary nature of the subject participation in the study. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Nearly 5 million children are diagnosed with asthma in the United States. Increasing asthma mortality and morbidity place children at risk. Resilience provides an understanding of individual variation in human behavioral responses within the context of environments filled with risk, adversity, and challenge. Data were collected from a sample of 235 children with asthma, aged 7 to 12 years, and a parent of each child in one of three settings: hospital-based pulmonary and allergy clinic, an office of a private pediatric allergist, and a summer camp specifically for school-aged children. The dates of collection were from July through October 1996. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: The exogenous construct Family was measured by the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Scale (FACES II) which assesses two dimensions of family: (a) family cohesion and (b) family adaptability (flexibility). The endogenous construct Child was measured by two instruments: Child Sense of Coherence Scale (CSOC) and a Self-Esteem Inventory. The endogenous construct Appraisal was measured by a child&rsquo;s version of an adult asthma symptom checklist. The endogenous construct Coping was measured by the Coping Health Inventory for Children (CHIC) that assesses five subscales that indicate coping patterns. The outcome variables were Quality of Life and Illness Indices. The Asthma Pediatric Quality of Life Questionnaire, that assesses three domains experienced by children with asthma, measured Quality of Life. Illness indices were measured by the number of days hospitalized, the number of days missed from school, and the number of emergency room visits, all due to asthma in the 3 months preceding the study interview. Methods: Data collected from telephone interviews with a parent of each child and a personal interview with each child (n=235) were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Findings: The results indicated six significant paths between the constructs family adaptability and cohesiveness, child self-esteem and sense of coherence, threat appraisal, coping styles, perceived quality of life, and asthma illness indices. Analysis revealed a goodness-of-fit index of 0.89. Fifteen percent of the variance of illness was explained by family functioning, specific child characteristics, appraisal and coping, and perceived quality of life. Conclusions: A theoretical model of resilience in children managing a health condition was developed and tested in a sample of children. The findings of this study contribute knowledge concerning the nature and dimensions of childhood resilience. This knowledge is highly relevant to professional nursing practice. Implications: Nurses who specialize in the care of children are well aware of the high prevalence rate of asthma. The findings should enable these nurses to identify the variables and visualize the paths by which children can be helped to manage asthma symptoms successfully. Also, a theoretical model of resilience in children managing a health condition has been proposed for further testing.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:12:31Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:12:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.