The Effect of Access to Information Following Pain Education on Cancer Pain Outcomes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156860
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Access to Information Following Pain Education on Cancer Pain Outcomes
Abstract:
The Effect of Access to Information Following Pain Education on Cancer Pain Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Wells, Nancy, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Title:
Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine if access to information about pain following cancer pain education for patient and primary caregiver would increase positive beliefs about cancer pain, thus improving pain management outcomes over a 6-month follow-up period. Design: This research included a 1-group pre-post design to test the effects of cancer pain education on patient and caregiver beliefs, and a randomized trial to evaluate the effects of access to information following pain education. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Patients with cancer-related pain and their primary caregivers were the population of interest. A sample of 64 patient and caregiver dyads were recruited from outpatient clinics located in an academic health center and a Veteran’s Administration medical center in the southeastern U.S. Subjects were recruited over a 2.5 year period from 1996-1999. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: All patients and their caregivers received a brief pain education program, which emphasized communication of pain to providers and the safety and efficacy of opioids used to manage pain. Patients randomized to the pain hot line received a 1-800 number to call with any questions or concerns about their pain management regimen. Patients receiving usual care did not have additional access to pain information. The Barriers Questionnaire-modified was used to measure patient beliefs about communication of pain and use of analgesics. Primary caregiver beliefs were measured with the Family Pain Questionnaire. Outcomes of pain management included pain intensity, interference in daily activity because of pain, pain relief (Brief Pain Inventory), and analgesics prescribed (Pain Management Index-revised). Methods: Data on beliefs were collected pre and post-education. Long-term outcomes were obtained at baseline and monthly for 6 months post-education using both telephone interview and mailed questionnaire methods. Findings: The patient sample consisted of married; 62% white; 92% men; 66% with a mean age of 53 years (range 19-79). Multiple cancer diagnoses were included with head & neck cancer (39%) the most common. Primary caregivers were predominantly spouses (64%). Patients and caregivers showed some improvement in beliefs from pre-to post-education. A significant improvement (p<.05) was found for patients’ beliefs about pain communication but not use of analgesics. Caregivers showed significant improvement (p<.05) in beliefs about use of opioids. Long-term outcomes of pain intensity, interference, relief, and analgesics prescribed did not differ by type of information group over the 6-month follow-up period. Conclusions: These findings suggest that pain education does improve beliefs about pain management for patients and their primary caregivers. Access to either patient-or provider-initiated information bout pain following education, however, did not affect long-term outcomes of cancer pain. Implications: While education does have an impact on patient and caregiver beliefs, further intervention(s) are needed to improve long-term outcomes for patients with cancer pain.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Access to Information Following Pain Education on Cancer Pain Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156860-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effect of Access to Information Following Pain Education on Cancer Pain Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wells, Nancy, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Vanderbilt University Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nancy.wells@mcmail.vanderbilt.</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine if access to information about pain following cancer pain education for patient and primary caregiver would increase positive beliefs about cancer pain, thus improving pain management outcomes over a 6-month follow-up period. Design: This research included a 1-group pre-post design to test the effects of cancer pain education on patient and caregiver beliefs, and a randomized trial to evaluate the effects of access to information following pain education. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Patients with cancer-related pain and their primary caregivers were the population of interest. A sample of 64 patient and caregiver dyads were recruited from outpatient clinics located in an academic health center and a Veteran&rsquo;s Administration medical center in the southeastern U.S. Subjects were recruited over a 2.5 year period from 1996-1999. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: All patients and their caregivers received a brief pain education program, which emphasized communication of pain to providers and the safety and efficacy of opioids used to manage pain. Patients randomized to the pain hot line received a 1-800 number to call with any questions or concerns about their pain management regimen. Patients receiving usual care did not have additional access to pain information. The Barriers Questionnaire-modified was used to measure patient beliefs about communication of pain and use of analgesics. Primary caregiver beliefs were measured with the Family Pain Questionnaire. Outcomes of pain management included pain intensity, interference in daily activity because of pain, pain relief (Brief Pain Inventory), and analgesics prescribed (Pain Management Index-revised). Methods: Data on beliefs were collected pre and post-education. Long-term outcomes were obtained at baseline and monthly for 6 months post-education using both telephone interview and mailed questionnaire methods. Findings: The patient sample consisted of married; 62% white; 92% men; 66% with a mean age of 53 years (range 19-79). Multiple cancer diagnoses were included with head &amp; neck cancer (39%) the most common. Primary caregivers were predominantly spouses (64%). Patients and caregivers showed some improvement in beliefs from pre-to post-education. A significant improvement (p&lt;.05) was found for patients&rsquo; beliefs about pain communication but not use of analgesics. Caregivers showed significant improvement (p&lt;.05) in beliefs about use of opioids. Long-term outcomes of pain intensity, interference, relief, and analgesics prescribed did not differ by type of information group over the 6-month follow-up period. Conclusions: These findings suggest that pain education does improve beliefs about pain management for patients and their primary caregivers. Access to either patient-or provider-initiated information bout pain following education, however, did not affect long-term outcomes of cancer pain. Implications: While education does have an impact on patient and caregiver beliefs, further intervention(s) are needed to improve long-term outcomes for patients with cancer pain.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:12:39Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:12:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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