2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156861
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Provider and Patient Compliance with ADA Guidelines in Rural Montana
Abstract:
Provider and Patient Compliance with ADA Guidelines in Rural Montana
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Zulkowski, Karen, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University-Bozeman
Title:Assistant Professor
Diabetes mellitus is frequently undiagnosed and insufficiently controlled within the frontier and rural populations of Montana. To prevent end-organ damage and other health complications it is important that both provider and patient comply with American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines. However, rural health care facilities have declining resources and rural diabetic patients face barriers to compliance unique to their isolated geographic location. Consequently, it is important to provide a cost-effective way to improve diabetes management among rural health care providers and to understand barriers from the diabetic perspective. Objective- The purpose of this preliminary study was to determine how well rural health care providers and diabetic patients in Montana have followed ADA clinical practice guidelines in the past two years. Further, this study examined if the rural provider has achieved diabetic control in the rural patient population, and what barriers to compliance the diabetic patients identify. Population - Data was collected through retrospective chart review at four rural health care facilities in Montana. Any patient over age 45 seen at the facilities since 1999 was eligible to participate. A total of 394 subjects were entered into the study. Variables Studied- Information collected was derived from the ADA clinical practice guidelines. For providers this included glycemic control, hypertension and lipid control, presence of dilated eye examinations, renal profiles, foot examinations, referrals and diabetic education. For patients this included quality of life, general knowledge of diabetes, ability to perform independent activities of daily living and barriers to treatment. Methods- Data analysis from chart reviews examined item frequency, medication use, additional diagnosis, and provider recommendations for care. Provider results were compared to national averages. Data analysis from diabetic patient questionnaires examined general diabetes knowledge, impact on quality of life and barriers to ADA guideline compliance. Findings- Several areas of deficiency have been identified in rural provider’s treatment of diabetic patients. Patient information is currently being collected and will be analyzed to describe barriers to treatment and quality of life issues. Conclusions- Study results show that ADA recommendations for diabetic treatment are being inconsistently utilized. Further barriers to patient compliance and impact on quality of life for rural diabetics will be discussed. Implications- Results of this study will be used to improve practice and meet the needs of rural diabetic patients in Montana. A provider and patient web site has been developed. For the providers a diabetic registry was established to help them control and treat their diabetic patients. For patients a nurse educator is providing diabetic counseling over low bandwidth technology. Data will again be collected at 12 and 24 months to look for changes in both provider and diabetic practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProvider and Patient Compliance with ADA Guidelines in Rural Montanaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156861-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Provider and Patient Compliance with ADA Guidelines in Rural Montana</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zulkowski, Karen, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University-Bozeman</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">karenz@montana.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Diabetes mellitus is frequently undiagnosed and insufficiently controlled within the frontier and rural populations of Montana. To prevent end-organ damage and other health complications it is important that both provider and patient comply with American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines. However, rural health care facilities have declining resources and rural diabetic patients face barriers to compliance unique to their isolated geographic location. Consequently, it is important to provide a cost-effective way to improve diabetes management among rural health care providers and to understand barriers from the diabetic perspective. Objective- The purpose of this preliminary study was to determine how well rural health care providers and diabetic patients in Montana have followed ADA clinical practice guidelines in the past two years. Further, this study examined if the rural provider has achieved diabetic control in the rural patient population, and what barriers to compliance the diabetic patients identify. Population - Data was collected through retrospective chart review at four rural health care facilities in Montana. Any patient over age 45 seen at the facilities since 1999 was eligible to participate. A total of 394 subjects were entered into the study. Variables Studied- Information collected was derived from the ADA clinical practice guidelines. For providers this included glycemic control, hypertension and lipid control, presence of dilated eye examinations, renal profiles, foot examinations, referrals and diabetic education. For patients this included quality of life, general knowledge of diabetes, ability to perform independent activities of daily living and barriers to treatment. Methods- Data analysis from chart reviews examined item frequency, medication use, additional diagnosis, and provider recommendations for care. Provider results were compared to national averages. Data analysis from diabetic patient questionnaires examined general diabetes knowledge, impact on quality of life and barriers to ADA guideline compliance. Findings- Several areas of deficiency have been identified in rural provider&rsquo;s treatment of diabetic patients. Patient information is currently being collected and will be analyzed to describe barriers to treatment and quality of life issues. Conclusions- Study results show that ADA recommendations for diabetic treatment are being inconsistently utilized. Further barriers to patient compliance and impact on quality of life for rural diabetics will be discussed. Implications- Results of this study will be used to improve practice and meet the needs of rural diabetic patients in Montana. A provider and patient web site has been developed. For the providers a diabetic registry was established to help them control and treat their diabetic patients. For patients a nurse educator is providing diabetic counseling over low bandwidth technology. Data will again be collected at 12 and 24 months to look for changes in both provider and diabetic practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:12:43Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:12:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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