Harnessing the Ability of Local Businesses to Become Active Partners In Community Health Assessment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156872
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Harnessing the Ability of Local Businesses to Become Active Partners In Community Health Assessment
Abstract:
Harnessing the Ability of Local Businesses to Become Active Partners In Community Health Assessment
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Mangum, Carl
P.I. Institution Name:University of Mississippi Medical Center
Title:Instructor
Objective: To demonstrate the role local businesses can play in community health assessment. Design: Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) mapping, businesses in Hinds County, Mississippi, USA were identified as potential data collection sites. These business sites were carefully selected based on county poverty trends and population density. After these business sites were identified, the researchers contacted by phone and letter the owners or managers of seventeen sites, explaining the research need for collecting data on under insured and uninsured patrons of their stores. A partnership between the University of Mississippi School of Nursing and each facility was formed. Population: Hinds County, Mississippi, USA has 91,030 households (2000 U.S. Census). Almost ten percent of the state population of Mississippi reside in Hinds County, which is also the location of the state capitol. Almost one quarter of the state=s population reside at or below the national poverty level. Hinds County has a racially and culturally diverse population consisting of 113,000 non-Hispanic whites, 2100 Hispanics, 130,000 African Americans, 200 native American Indians and 1500 Asians. Many of Hinds County residents reside in poverty; particularly children and female-headed households. Sample: Seventeen non-healthcare related businesses were utilized for the study. The businesses were logistically located in areas of Hinds County, Mississippi identified by GIS technology based on population density and income level. Sites included small local community groceries, large business conglomerates, such as Wal-Mart, community colleges and shelters. Setting: The businesses selected were founded in both urban and rural sites. Businesses that provide items for daily living such as food and clothing were identified as priority collection sites. Four types of businesses were identified for inclusion in the study: small local grocery or convenience stores, large super stores, shelters and community colleges. The businesses were selected to provide the greatest access to the three study sub groups: low income populations, the homeless and college students. In the rural parts of the county, the largest grocery/convenience store in the community was chosen in order to access the greatest number of residents in the rural area. In the urban area, grocery stores in different sections of the city were chosen to access the population from areas with the highest population density. Hinds Community College was a selected as a site to capture the college age student who resides at home. The two Super Wal-Mart stores in Hinds County were selected as site to access all sub groups. Also, they provided access to the largest number of people. Lastly, two homeless shelters were identified as sites to access the homeless population. Year: Summer, 2001. Concept or Variables studied together: This study demonstrates the unconventional use of local businesses in assessing the health status and health services utilization of local community residents. Variables included location, size, and nature of the businesses. Methods: GIS mapping was completed to successfully identify those businesses patronized by a large number of the people throughout the county. A letter describing the goals of the study, the scope of the study, and the need for partnerships with community businesses to accomplish the data collection was mailed to each site. As a follow up, two grant team researchers then personally visited each facility and met with the business leaders to discuss the study and determine feasible logistics, such as where the collection would take place, physical space needed, and traffic flow. The researchers and business leaders designed a plan for data collection that would not be intrusive to customers or diminish business transactions. The business owners were contacted again by mail with reminders of data collection dates, and a letter of agreement between each facility and the School of Nursing was signed. At the completion of the study personnel at the business sites were surveyed relative to their reaction to the process. Conclusions: Comments received by the research team from the business leaders indicate high levels of excitement and enthusiasm for the research project. Because of the successful GIS mapping, a minimal number of sites still managed to produce a sample size of 760. Findings: Data analysis will be completed in Fall 2001. The results of the findings relative to the variables will be presented at the conference. Implications: Partnering with businesses as active participants in the research process provided the environment for effective data collection regarding the healthcare status of the local community.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHarnessing the Ability of Local Businesses to Become Active Partners In Community Health Assessmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156872-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Harnessing the Ability of Local Businesses to Become Active Partners In Community Health Assessment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mangum, Carl</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Mississippi Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cmangum@son.umsmed.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To demonstrate the role local businesses can play in community health assessment. Design: Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) mapping, businesses in Hinds County, Mississippi, USA were identified as potential data collection sites. These business sites were carefully selected based on county poverty trends and population density. After these business sites were identified, the researchers contacted by phone and letter the owners or managers of seventeen sites, explaining the research need for collecting data on under insured and uninsured patrons of their stores. A partnership between the University of Mississippi School of Nursing and each facility was formed. Population: Hinds County, Mississippi, USA has 91,030 households (2000 U.S. Census). Almost ten percent of the state population of Mississippi reside in Hinds County, which is also the location of the state capitol. Almost one quarter of the state=s population reside at or below the national poverty level. Hinds County has a racially and culturally diverse population consisting of 113,000 non-Hispanic whites, 2100 Hispanics, 130,000 African Americans, 200 native American Indians and 1500 Asians. Many of Hinds County residents reside in poverty; particularly children and female-headed households. Sample: Seventeen non-healthcare related businesses were utilized for the study. The businesses were logistically located in areas of Hinds County, Mississippi identified by GIS technology based on population density and income level. Sites included small local community groceries, large business conglomerates, such as Wal-Mart, community colleges and shelters. Setting: The businesses selected were founded in both urban and rural sites. Businesses that provide items for daily living such as food and clothing were identified as priority collection sites. Four types of businesses were identified for inclusion in the study: small local grocery or convenience stores, large super stores, shelters and community colleges. The businesses were selected to provide the greatest access to the three study sub groups: low income populations, the homeless and college students. In the rural parts of the county, the largest grocery/convenience store in the community was chosen in order to access the greatest number of residents in the rural area. In the urban area, grocery stores in different sections of the city were chosen to access the population from areas with the highest population density. Hinds Community College was a selected as a site to capture the college age student who resides at home. The two Super Wal-Mart stores in Hinds County were selected as site to access all sub groups. Also, they provided access to the largest number of people. Lastly, two homeless shelters were identified as sites to access the homeless population. Year: Summer, 2001. Concept or Variables studied together: This study demonstrates the unconventional use of local businesses in assessing the health status and health services utilization of local community residents. Variables included location, size, and nature of the businesses. Methods: GIS mapping was completed to successfully identify those businesses patronized by a large number of the people throughout the county. A letter describing the goals of the study, the scope of the study, and the need for partnerships with community businesses to accomplish the data collection was mailed to each site. As a follow up, two grant team researchers then personally visited each facility and met with the business leaders to discuss the study and determine feasible logistics, such as where the collection would take place, physical space needed, and traffic flow. The researchers and business leaders designed a plan for data collection that would not be intrusive to customers or diminish business transactions. The business owners were contacted again by mail with reminders of data collection dates, and a letter of agreement between each facility and the School of Nursing was signed. At the completion of the study personnel at the business sites were surveyed relative to their reaction to the process. Conclusions: Comments received by the research team from the business leaders indicate high levels of excitement and enthusiasm for the research project. Because of the successful GIS mapping, a minimal number of sites still managed to produce a sample size of 760. Findings: Data analysis will be completed in Fall 2001. The results of the findings relative to the variables will be presented at the conference. Implications: Partnering with businesses as active participants in the research process provided the environment for effective data collection regarding the healthcare status of the local community.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:13:23Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:13:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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