The Influence of Sociodemographic Factors and Decision Style on African-American Women's Breast Cancer Treatment Choices

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156875
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Influence of Sociodemographic Factors and Decision Style on African-American Women's Breast Cancer Treatment Choices
Abstract:
The Influence of Sociodemographic Factors and Decision Style on African-American Women's Breast Cancer Treatment Choices
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Pierce, Penny, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Associate Professor
Purpose: To better understand the decision styles of African-American women concerning breast cancer treatment, to identify characteristics (e.g., age, education, income) associated with different decision making styles, and to determine if these factors influence the preference for lumpectomy or mastectomy. Method: The Michigan Assessment of Decision Style (MADS), was administered to 471 women to identify how sociodemographic factors (e.g., ethnicity, age, and education) are related to decision making processes. One sample was a community-based sample of white women seeking breast cancer screening at a major medical center (n=254, 56%) and the second sample was a community sample of non-health seeking African American women (n=217, 46%) who attended a work or church-affiliated health fair. Results: The MADS consists of four independent factors. Two factors, Avoidance and Deferring Responsibility, indicate a preference to minimize personal involvement in the decision and defer the responsibility to another. The two remaining factors, Information Seeking and Deliberation, indicate a propensity for involvement in the decision making process. Education level was positively associated with Information Seeking (r=.14, p<.01) and Deliberation (r=.22, p<.001) and negatively associated with Avoidance (r=-.32, p<.001) meaning that those women with less education were less likely to seek information and use the information in any deliberative way and were more likely to avoid making a decision. Another important sociodemographic factor, income, was negatively associated with Avoidance (r=-.29, p<.001) and positively associated with Deliberation (r=.11, p<.05) indicating those with less economic resources were more likely to avoid the decision and those with greater resources engaged in more deliberative decision behavior. Women scoring high on Information Seeking and Deliberation were equally likely to choose mastectomy or lumpectomy however, those scoring high on Deferring were signficantly more likely to choose mastectomy (t (284)=-2.18, p<.05) as were those scoring high on Avoiding (t (291)=-2.40, p<.05). Conclusion: Sociodemographic factors, including culture, may be more influential in decision making processes than previously thought. Efforts to explicitly incorporate these factors into decision support interventions would be worthwhile and focus future research toward developing culturally-effective aids. Implications: The development of decision aids and decision support interventions are more relevant and effective when developed with cultural and sociodemographic factors specific to a population in mind.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Influence of Sociodemographic Factors and Decision Style on African-American Women's Breast Cancer Treatment Choicesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156875-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Influence of Sociodemographic Factors and Decision Style on African-American Women's Breast Cancer Treatment Choices</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pierce, Penny, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pfpierce@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To better understand the decision styles of African-American women concerning breast cancer treatment, to identify characteristics (e.g., age, education, income) associated with different decision making styles, and to determine if these factors influence the preference for lumpectomy or mastectomy. Method: The Michigan Assessment of Decision Style (MADS), was administered to 471 women to identify how sociodemographic factors (e.g., ethnicity, age, and education) are related to decision making processes. One sample was a community-based sample of white women seeking breast cancer screening at a major medical center (n=254, 56%) and the second sample was a community sample of non-health seeking African American women (n=217, 46%) who attended a work or church-affiliated health fair. Results: The MADS consists of four independent factors. Two factors, Avoidance and Deferring Responsibility, indicate a preference to minimize personal involvement in the decision and defer the responsibility to another. The two remaining factors, Information Seeking and Deliberation, indicate a propensity for involvement in the decision making process. Education level was positively associated with Information Seeking (r=.14, p&lt;.01) and Deliberation (r=.22, p&lt;.001) and negatively associated with Avoidance (r=-.32, p&lt;.001) meaning that those women with less education were less likely to seek information and use the information in any deliberative way and were more likely to avoid making a decision. Another important sociodemographic factor, income, was negatively associated with Avoidance (r=-.29, p&lt;.001) and positively associated with Deliberation (r=.11, p&lt;.05) indicating those with less economic resources were more likely to avoid the decision and those with greater resources engaged in more deliberative decision behavior. Women scoring high on Information Seeking and Deliberation were equally likely to choose mastectomy or lumpectomy however, those scoring high on Deferring were signficantly more likely to choose mastectomy (t (284)=-2.18, p&lt;.05) as were those scoring high on Avoiding (t (291)=-2.40, p&lt;.05). Conclusion: Sociodemographic factors, including culture, may be more influential in decision making processes than previously thought. Efforts to explicitly incorporate these factors into decision support interventions would be worthwhile and focus future research toward developing culturally-effective aids. Implications: The development of decision aids and decision support interventions are more relevant and effective when developed with cultural and sociodemographic factors specific to a population in mind.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:13:34Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:13:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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