The Nurse Work Environment in Magnet Hospitals: A Comparison between Oncology and Medical-Surgical Units

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156882
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Nurse Work Environment in Magnet Hospitals: A Comparison between Oncology and Medical-Surgical Units
Abstract:
The Nurse Work Environment in Magnet Hospitals: A Comparison between Oncology and Medical-Surgical Units
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Conference Date:July 10-12, 2003
Author:Friese, Christopher, RN, MS, OCN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing
Title:Pre-Doctoral Fellow
Objective: Magnet hospitals - hospitals that retain and attract nurses – report superior outcomes. This study examined the nurse work environment (NWE) by oncology nurses and non-oncology nurses in magnet hospitals.<P> Design: Secondary analysis of a cross-sectional study (R01-NINR-02280).<P> Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Twenty magnet hospitals participated in the study; Thirteen identified in 1983 (reputational), and 7 recognized by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) between 1994-1998. From 1998-1999, nurses providing direct care on medical and surgical units were anonymously surveyed. Of 4,085 surveys distributed, 2287 usable responses were received.<P> Variables: NWE was measured by five subscales of the PES-NWI; Nurse Participation in Hospital Affairs (participation), Nursing Foundations for Quality (foundations), Nurse Manager Ability (manager), Staffing and Resource Adequacy (staffing), and Collegial Nurse-Physician Relationships (relations). Nurses worked in oncology (ONC) or non-oncology units (NON), and in reputational or ANCC hospitals.<P> Methods: T-tests on the subscales compared: 1) 95 ONCs versus 714 NONs in 12 reputational hospitals; and 2) 156 ONCs in 7 ANCC magnets versus 95 ONCs in 12 reputational hospitals (One reputational hospital had no ONCs).<P> Findings: 1) ONCs rated their NWE poorer on all subscales (NS). ONCs reported poorer staffing (p < .05), and better relations (p < .05) than NONs. 2) ONCs in ANCC hospitals had higher scores on all subscales. Participation, staffing, and foundations were significantly higher (p < .01).<P> Conclusions: Oncology and non-oncology nurses had different assessments of their NWE. ONCs in ANCC hospitals reported more favorable work environments than ONCs in reputational hospitals. Staffing adequacy was poor for all nurses, and all oncology nurses had good physician relations.<P> Implications: ANCC recognition validates the presence of professional NWEs for nurses. Nurses benefit from investments in professional practice models. Future research should identify patient and nurse outcomes from magnet recognition, controlling for nursing specialty. <!--Abstract 13020 modified by 130.91.159.23 on 11-5-2002--></P></P></P></P></P></P></P>
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Jul-2003
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Nurse Work Environment in Magnet Hospitals: A Comparison between Oncology and Medical-Surgical Unitsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156882-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Nurse Work Environment in Magnet Hospitals: A Comparison between Oncology and Medical-Surgical Units</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 10-12, 2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Friese, Christopher, RN, MS, OCN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Pre-Doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cfriese@nursing.upenn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Magnet hospitals - hospitals that retain and attract nurses &ndash; report superior outcomes. This study examined the nurse work environment (NWE) by oncology nurses and non-oncology nurses in magnet hospitals.&lt;P&gt; Design: Secondary analysis of a cross-sectional study (R01-NINR-02280).&lt;P&gt; Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Twenty magnet hospitals participated in the study; Thirteen identified in 1983 (reputational), and 7 recognized by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) between 1994-1998. From 1998-1999, nurses providing direct care on medical and surgical units were anonymously surveyed. Of 4,085 surveys distributed, 2287 usable responses were received.&lt;P&gt; Variables: NWE was measured by five subscales of the PES-NWI; Nurse Participation in Hospital Affairs (participation), Nursing Foundations for Quality (foundations), Nurse Manager Ability (manager), Staffing and Resource Adequacy (staffing), and Collegial Nurse-Physician Relationships (relations). Nurses worked in oncology (ONC) or non-oncology units (NON), and in reputational or ANCC hospitals.&lt;P&gt; Methods: T-tests on the subscales compared: 1) 95 ONCs versus 714 NONs in 12 reputational hospitals; and 2) 156 ONCs in 7 ANCC magnets versus 95 ONCs in 12 reputational hospitals (One reputational hospital had no ONCs).&lt;P&gt; Findings: 1) ONCs rated their NWE poorer on all subscales (NS). ONCs reported poorer staffing (p &lt; .05), and better relations (p &lt; .05) than NONs. 2) ONCs in ANCC hospitals had higher scores on all subscales. Participation, staffing, and foundations were significantly higher (p &lt; .01).&lt;P&gt; Conclusions: Oncology and non-oncology nurses had different assessments of their NWE. ONCs in ANCC hospitals reported more favorable work environments than ONCs in reputational hospitals. Staffing adequacy was poor for all nurses, and all oncology nurses had good physician relations.&lt;P&gt; Implications: ANCC recognition validates the presence of professional NWEs for nurses. Nurses benefit from investments in professional practice models. Future research should identify patient and nurse outcomes from magnet recognition, controlling for nursing specialty. &lt;!--Abstract 13020 modified by 130.91.159.23 on 11-5-2002--&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:13:59Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:13:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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