2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156953
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Tele-ICU Nursing Interventions: Impact on Patient Safety & Nursing Practice
Author(s):
Barden, Connie; Hall, Yvette; Williams, Lisa-Mae; Dominguez, Rosario; Gidel, Louis; Willmitch, Laurie
Author Details:
Connie Barden, RN/CNS,MSN,CCRN,CCNS, Baptist Health South Florida, Miami, Florida, USA, email: Connie.Barden@gmail.com; Yvette Hall; Lisa-Mae Williams; Rosario Dominguez; Louis Gidel; Laurie Willmitch
Abstract:
PURPOSE: The literature associated with tele-ICU outcomes is usually defined by the interventions of intensivist physicians. Few studies exist that describe the impact of nurses in the tele-ICU setting. The goal of this project was to describe the impact of tele-ICU nursing practice and interventions on outcomes produced over 1 year. Results show important and clear contributions by tele-ICU nurses not only to patient care and safety, but to facilitating and enhancing nursing practice as well. DESCRIPTION: From September 2008 through August 2009, nursing interventions made by tele-ICU nurses at Baptist Health South Florida were collected by nurses who made the interventions, nurses who observed others making them, or other staff who were involved in the unit. Reports of interventions were collected first in writing and then via e-mail and sent to the clinical nurse specialist of the tele-ICU. Several meetings were held over time to work with staff to identify the independent and interdependent interventions that occurred on a daily basis. Nurses were asked to send their "stories" as they occurred with enough text to describe the event. Interventions were categorized in 1 of the following 4 categories: rescue, assist, prevention, or first aid. Working definitions of these categories were rescue patient in trouble; immediate action required; assistance interventions that were initiated by the eICU nurse; prevention interventions that likely prevented occurrences such as falls, self-extubation, and allergic reactions; and first-aid interventions such as troubleshooting equipment, thinking together, educating bedside staff, answering questions and requests initiated by the bedside team. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Nearly 600 nursing interventions were documented and categorized in the study period. There were 150 interventions directly affecting safety; for example, falls prevented, medication/allergy issues, and patient ID issues. Thirty-one of the interventions clearly avoided patientsÆ clinical demise. There were 445 interventions directly enhancing nursing practice; for example, ensuring best practices, coaching of nurses, and assisting nurses with care tasks or watching patients while nurses were busy. Conclusions from the study are that tele-ICU nursing significantly affects patient safety and transforms the way in which bedside care is delivered.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTele-ICU Nursing Interventions: Impact on Patient Safety & Nursing Practiceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarden, Connieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHall, Yvetteen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Lisa-Maeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDominguez, Rosarioen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGidel, Louisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWillmitch, Laurieen_GB
dc.author.detailsConnie Barden, RN/CNS,MSN,CCRN,CCNS, Baptist Health South Florida, Miami, Florida, USA, email: Connie.Barden@gmail.com; Yvette Hall; Lisa-Mae Williams; Rosario Dominguez; Louis Gidel; Laurie Willmitchen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156953-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The literature associated with tele-ICU outcomes is usually defined by the interventions of intensivist physicians. Few studies exist that describe the impact of nurses in the tele-ICU setting. The goal of this project was to describe the impact of tele-ICU nursing practice and interventions on outcomes produced over 1 year. Results show important and clear contributions by tele-ICU nurses not only to patient care and safety, but to facilitating and enhancing nursing practice as well. DESCRIPTION: From September 2008 through August 2009, nursing interventions made by tele-ICU nurses at Baptist Health South Florida were collected by nurses who made the interventions, nurses who observed others making them, or other staff who were involved in the unit. Reports of interventions were collected first in writing and then via e-mail and sent to the clinical nurse specialist of the tele-ICU. Several meetings were held over time to work with staff to identify the independent and interdependent interventions that occurred on a daily basis. Nurses were asked to send their "stories" as they occurred with enough text to describe the event. Interventions were categorized in 1 of the following 4 categories: rescue, assist, prevention, or first aid. Working definitions of these categories were rescue patient in trouble; immediate action required; assistance interventions that were initiated by the eICU nurse; prevention interventions that likely prevented occurrences such as falls, self-extubation, and allergic reactions; and first-aid interventions such as troubleshooting equipment, thinking together, educating bedside staff, answering questions and requests initiated by the bedside team. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Nearly 600 nursing interventions were documented and categorized in the study period. There were 150 interventions directly affecting safety; for example, falls prevented, medication/allergy issues, and patient ID issues. Thirty-one of the interventions clearly avoided patientsÆ clinical demise. There were 445 interventions directly enhancing nursing practice; for example, ensuring best practices, coaching of nurses, and assisting nurses with care tasks or watching patients while nurses were busy. Conclusions from the study are that tele-ICU nursing significantly affects patient safety and transforms the way in which bedside care is delivered.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:17:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:17:26Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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