2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156956
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
HELP! Is anybody out there?: Implementing a patient/family activated emergency response
Author(s):
Bogert, Soudi; Ferrell, Carmen
Author Details:
Soudi Bogert, RN,BS,PHN, St. Joseph Hospital, Orange, California, USA, email: soudi.bogert@stjoe.org; Carmen Ferrell
Abstract:
PURPOSE: According to the Josie King Foundation, medical errors are the fourth largest cause of death in the United States each year, amounting to 98000 deaths. Hospitals are engaging their patients and families to help prevent potential medical errors. St. Joseph Hospital (SJH) proactively addresses system problems to improve the delivery of patient care and minimize errors. As a proactive measure, SJH has instituted a mechanism to give patients/families the ability to access an emergency response team. DESCRIPTION: In providing the best care, our rapid response team developed a patient/family activated emergency response we call Condition H (HELP), as supported by the Institute of Healthcare Improvement. This allows patients and families to be involved in their plan of care. We created a timeline, rallied all disciplines, and educated staff. We also shared the story of Josie King, an 18-month-old girl, who suffered fatal consequences due to medical errors, which depicts how a breakdown in communication among the health care team can have detrimental outcomes. It was important for staff to understand the programÆs purpose and intention. In preparing, brochures were developed to educate on the program and how to use it. In addition, a responsibilities grid, algorithm, documentation form, and operator tree were created. Hospital disciplines were updated and involved at each planning stage, staff and Condition H team members were thoroughly educated and mock drills were conducted. In September 2007, we piloted this program and implemented it hospital wide in March 2009. We have had more than 30 calls in the last 18 months addressing a variety of concerns, including issues related to D/C planning, pain management, confusion with plan of care, and medical deterioration. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Each event is evaluated with the caller and reviewed by the committee. It is also shared with all units and medical and administrative staff. Some challenges we have faced include staff concern of punitive measures, lack of patient education of the program, and clarifying team and staff roles. Some issues identified include confusion with care when multiple physicians are involved, D/C-related concerns, and communication breakdown between the team. Overall, all callers have been satisfied with the program, regardless of the outcome, and feel safer knowing the program is available to them. We have shared our journey and assisted many facilities nationwide in developing their own program.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHELP! Is anybody out there?: Implementing a patient/family activated emergency responseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBogert, Soudien_GB
dc.contributor.authorFerrell, Carmenen_GB
dc.author.detailsSoudi Bogert, RN,BS,PHN, St. Joseph Hospital, Orange, California, USA, email: soudi.bogert@stjoe.org; Carmen Ferrellen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156956-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: According to the Josie King Foundation, medical errors are the fourth largest cause of death in the United States each year, amounting to 98000 deaths. Hospitals are engaging their patients and families to help prevent potential medical errors. St. Joseph Hospital (SJH) proactively addresses system problems to improve the delivery of patient care and minimize errors. As a proactive measure, SJH has instituted a mechanism to give patients/families the ability to access an emergency response team. DESCRIPTION: In providing the best care, our rapid response team developed a patient/family activated emergency response we call Condition H (HELP), as supported by the Institute of Healthcare Improvement. This allows patients and families to be involved in their plan of care. We created a timeline, rallied all disciplines, and educated staff. We also shared the story of Josie King, an 18-month-old girl, who suffered fatal consequences due to medical errors, which depicts how a breakdown in communication among the health care team can have detrimental outcomes. It was important for staff to understand the programÆs purpose and intention. In preparing, brochures were developed to educate on the program and how to use it. In addition, a responsibilities grid, algorithm, documentation form, and operator tree were created. Hospital disciplines were updated and involved at each planning stage, staff and Condition H team members were thoroughly educated and mock drills were conducted. In September 2007, we piloted this program and implemented it hospital wide in March 2009. We have had more than 30 calls in the last 18 months addressing a variety of concerns, including issues related to D/C planning, pain management, confusion with plan of care, and medical deterioration. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Each event is evaluated with the caller and reviewed by the committee. It is also shared with all units and medical and administrative staff. Some challenges we have faced include staff concern of punitive measures, lack of patient education of the program, and clarifying team and staff roles. Some issues identified include confusion with care when multiple physicians are involved, D/C-related concerns, and communication breakdown between the team. Overall, all callers have been satisfied with the program, regardless of the outcome, and feel safer knowing the program is available to them. We have shared our journey and assisted many facilities nationwide in developing their own program.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:17:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:17:36Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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