2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156958
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Charge Nurse Development: An Investment in Leadership Success and Satisfaction
Author(s):
Bradshaw, Debra; Hudson, Patti
Author Details:
Debra Bradshaw, RN,CNAA-BC, East Carolina Heart Institute at Pitt County Memorial Hospital, Greenville, North Carolina, USA, email: dbradshaw@pcmh.com; Patti Hudson
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Creating the next generation of nurse leaders starts with providing structured education for charge nurse leadership development. Brainstorming with charge nurses from each unit identified the initial learning needs. Our hospital developed education programs from these learning needs; the objectives included being clinical/ human resource liaisons, communicating effectively, mentoring staff, ensuring quality and safety standards are met, conflict management, delegation, and leading teams. DESCRIPTION: Learning needs from charge nurses included daily tasks, responsibilities from A to Z and self-identified learning needs. Information was categorized and a task force of nurse managers, educational specialists and organizational development leaders evaluated and planned the development journey for charge nurses. The plan consisted of 4 Steps. Step 1: Managers and peers evaluated charge nurses based on accountability, assertiveness, attitude, communication, and resourcefulness. This tool was developed to provide an objective measurement of behavior. Step 2: Revised the charge nurse competency tool that measures performance. Both tools will be used to evaluate charge nurses annually. Step 3: Developed a 4-hour charge nurse seminar facilitated by the unit management. The purpose was to demonstrate the manager's commitment to charge nurse development, clarify expectations, and foster commitment to the role. Step 4: Created 2-day educational session. Day 1 focused on communication, conflict resolution, and motivating and leading teams. Day 2 focused on leadership style, patient placement, service recovery, and quality initiatives. Each participant received charge nurse notebooks with important protocols, guidelines, and resource listings. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:The charge nurse development program has proven to be an important initiative. Four hundred charges nurses have completed all 4 steps of the program. Feedback and evaluation results validated the need for the program with very positive summaries and comments. Developing charge nurses has empowered our staff, increased frontline accountability, enhanced competency, increased teamwork and collaboration across divisions. Outcome data have shown improvements in patient and staff satisfaction and all quality initiative priorities. The charge nurse role has a new identity and sense of purpose, appreciation, and renewed commitment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCharge Nurse Development: An Investment in Leadership Success and Satisfactionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBradshaw, Debraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHudson, Pattien_GB
dc.author.detailsDebra Bradshaw, RN,CNAA-BC, East Carolina Heart Institute at Pitt County Memorial Hospital, Greenville, North Carolina, USA, email: dbradshaw@pcmh.com; Patti Hudsonen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156958-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Creating the next generation of nurse leaders starts with providing structured education for charge nurse leadership development. Brainstorming with charge nurses from each unit identified the initial learning needs. Our hospital developed education programs from these learning needs; the objectives included being clinical/ human resource liaisons, communicating effectively, mentoring staff, ensuring quality and safety standards are met, conflict management, delegation, and leading teams. DESCRIPTION: Learning needs from charge nurses included daily tasks, responsibilities from A to Z and self-identified learning needs. Information was categorized and a task force of nurse managers, educational specialists and organizational development leaders evaluated and planned the development journey for charge nurses. The plan consisted of 4 Steps. Step 1: Managers and peers evaluated charge nurses based on accountability, assertiveness, attitude, communication, and resourcefulness. This tool was developed to provide an objective measurement of behavior. Step 2: Revised the charge nurse competency tool that measures performance. Both tools will be used to evaluate charge nurses annually. Step 3: Developed a 4-hour charge nurse seminar facilitated by the unit management. The purpose was to demonstrate the manager's commitment to charge nurse development, clarify expectations, and foster commitment to the role. Step 4: Created 2-day educational session. Day 1 focused on communication, conflict resolution, and motivating and leading teams. Day 2 focused on leadership style, patient placement, service recovery, and quality initiatives. Each participant received charge nurse notebooks with important protocols, guidelines, and resource listings. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:The charge nurse development program has proven to be an important initiative. Four hundred charges nurses have completed all 4 steps of the program. Feedback and evaluation results validated the need for the program with very positive summaries and comments. Developing charge nurses has empowered our staff, increased frontline accountability, enhanced competency, increased teamwork and collaboration across divisions. Outcome data have shown improvements in patient and staff satisfaction and all quality initiative priorities. The charge nurse role has a new identity and sense of purpose, appreciation, and renewed commitment.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:17:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:17:43Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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