Rapid Response Teams: Nurses' Perceptions and Patient Outcomes in Monitored Versus Non-monitored Hospital Units

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156959
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Rapid Response Teams: Nurses' Perceptions and Patient Outcomes in Monitored Versus Non-monitored Hospital Units
Author(s):
Browne, Jennifer A.; Murphree, Amanda
Author Details:
Jennifer A. Browne, RN,MSN,CCRN,RN-BC, Northeast Baptist Hospital, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: jbrowne1957@sbcglobal.net; Amanda Murphree
Abstract:
POSTER PURPOSE: This pilot study explored rapid response team (RRT) outcomes specific to nursesÆ value perceptions. Effectiveness of RRTs is usually measured by patientsÆ outcomes. This research expands RRT evaluation to include nurse-sensitive outcomes. The research questions were as follows: Does an existing RRT program affect nursing satisfaction from organizational or human resource perspectives? Is there a difference in RRT value perceptions between monitored and nonmonitored nursing units? BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:Originating with the Institute of Healthcare ImprovementÆs 100 000 Lives Campaign, RRTs have been recommended by regulatory, accrediting, and government agencies. Initially, little evidence supported these teams; endorsement originated from an anecdotal, common-sense posture. The ensuing evaluative research of RRTs that specifically focused on mortality and morbidity has produced mixed findings at best. RRT effectiveness should be evaluated by using a broader range of outcomes. METHOD: This nonexperimental study approved by the institutional review board was undertaken at a 300-bed acute care hospital in South Texas. A convenience sample (n = 72) of nonûcritical care nurses was used. A survey consisting of 12 statements with responses on a Likert scale from 1 to 5 was administered to RNs and licensed practical nurses who had used the RRT in the past 6 months. Day and night shift had equivalent samples. Patients' outcomes (mortality/morbidity) and nursesÆ perceptions of the value of the RRT from an organizational perspective (value, educational opportunity, and teamwork) and a human resource perspective (retention, recruitment, nurse advocacy, and mentorship) were evaluated. RESULTS: Preliminary analysis of patientsÆ outcome data resulted in mixed outcomes similar to national research findings. Analysis of the RRT nursing outcomes, however, using descriptive and correlational statistics, suggests that RRTs do affect recruitment and influence nursesÆ decisions to remain employed. High mean scores and standard deviations were relatively uniform across all license types, shifts, and lengths of employment. Patterns were identified by location; nurses in nonmonitored areas scored higher in relation to human resource variables, suggesting even more importance linked to RRTs and the healthy work environment of these units. CONCLUSIONS: As current research is resulting in mixed results with respect to patientsÆ outcomes, this study supports the position that RRTs may be of more value to organizations and nursing services than previously identified. These results may have direct implications for RRT selection and training, the RRT to staff interaction focus, as well as hospital RRT marketing. Results will provide the framework for further study-specifically, comparative analysis between patient and nursing outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRapid Response Teams: Nurses' Perceptions and Patient Outcomes in Monitored Versus Non-monitored Hospital Unitsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrowne, Jennifer A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorMurphree, Amandaen_GB
dc.author.detailsJennifer A. Browne, RN,MSN,CCRN,RN-BC, Northeast Baptist Hospital, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: jbrowne1957@sbcglobal.net; Amanda Murphreeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156959-
dc.description.abstractPOSTER PURPOSE: This pilot study explored rapid response team (RRT) outcomes specific to nursesÆ value perceptions. Effectiveness of RRTs is usually measured by patientsÆ outcomes. This research expands RRT evaluation to include nurse-sensitive outcomes. The research questions were as follows: Does an existing RRT program affect nursing satisfaction from organizational or human resource perspectives? Is there a difference in RRT value perceptions between monitored and nonmonitored nursing units? BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:Originating with the Institute of Healthcare ImprovementÆs 100 000 Lives Campaign, RRTs have been recommended by regulatory, accrediting, and government agencies. Initially, little evidence supported these teams; endorsement originated from an anecdotal, common-sense posture. The ensuing evaluative research of RRTs that specifically focused on mortality and morbidity has produced mixed findings at best. RRT effectiveness should be evaluated by using a broader range of outcomes. METHOD: This nonexperimental study approved by the institutional review board was undertaken at a 300-bed acute care hospital in South Texas. A convenience sample (n = 72) of nonûcritical care nurses was used. A survey consisting of 12 statements with responses on a Likert scale from 1 to 5 was administered to RNs and licensed practical nurses who had used the RRT in the past 6 months. Day and night shift had equivalent samples. Patients' outcomes (mortality/morbidity) and nursesÆ perceptions of the value of the RRT from an organizational perspective (value, educational opportunity, and teamwork) and a human resource perspective (retention, recruitment, nurse advocacy, and mentorship) were evaluated. RESULTS: Preliminary analysis of patientsÆ outcome data resulted in mixed outcomes similar to national research findings. Analysis of the RRT nursing outcomes, however, using descriptive and correlational statistics, suggests that RRTs do affect recruitment and influence nursesÆ decisions to remain employed. High mean scores and standard deviations were relatively uniform across all license types, shifts, and lengths of employment. Patterns were identified by location; nurses in nonmonitored areas scored higher in relation to human resource variables, suggesting even more importance linked to RRTs and the healthy work environment of these units. CONCLUSIONS: As current research is resulting in mixed results with respect to patientsÆ outcomes, this study supports the position that RRTs may be of more value to organizations and nursing services than previously identified. These results may have direct implications for RRT selection and training, the RRT to staff interaction focus, as well as hospital RRT marketing. Results will provide the framework for further study-specifically, comparative analysis between patient and nursing outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:17:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:17:46Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.