2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156961
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A comparison of a behavioral and a subjective pain scale in a TCV-PO patient population.
Author(s):
Buffmire, Marie V.; White, Marcia
Author Details:
Marie V. Buffmire, RN,CCRN,RDMS, University of Virginia Health Systems, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: dvbuffmire@embarqmail.com; Marcia White
Abstract:
PURPOSE: The critical care division of our institution use the Modified FLACC pain scale to assess the presence and level of pain in nonverbal patients. This tool was adapted from the FLACC pain scale by a nurse at our institution. The Modified FLACC pain scale tool ranks objective patient behaviors to determine a pain score; it has not been validated as a reliable tool. The Wong-Baker FACES scale has been validated as a reliable tool. This study is designed to evaluate these 2 pain scales. DESCRIPTION: This study began as a unit quality improvement project. The initial data collected was reviewed by the quality improvement project team and the preliminary results were significant for the study of pain assessment in this patient population. During early postoperative recovery, patients are unable to effectively communicate their pain to their caregivers. An application for an expedited convenience nursing research study was made to the institutional review board for human research. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:This is a prospective, observational, convenience study on 60 patients using the 2 pain scales. Pain assessment training is provided by the acute pain service nursing coordinator for all the clinician observers collecting data for the study. The Wong-Baker FACES scale, 0 to 10, is used by alert verbal patients to describe their pain level to one of the observers at a predetermined time. The other observer assesses and documents the patientÆs nonverbal behaviors and body language on the Modified FLACC tool during the same assessment period. All thoracic cardiovascular surgery patients in the ICU were included if they were alert and older than 18 years of age. Measures to prevent bias during the data collection include separate interactions with the patients by the observers. The results of the Modified FLACC will not provided to the second observer. The same patient will be assessed by 2 observers for the same time specified. This study has tremendous potential for clinical use and future research. There is no "approved pain assessment tool" for nonverbal patients at this time. This research will benefit from rigorous study oversight, increase the knowledge and improve the practice of pain assessment in non-verbal patients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA comparison of a behavioral and a subjective pain scale in a TCV-PO patient population.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBuffmire, Marie V.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Marciaen_GB
dc.author.detailsMarie V. Buffmire, RN,CCRN,RDMS, University of Virginia Health Systems, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: dvbuffmire@embarqmail.com; Marcia Whiteen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156961-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The critical care division of our institution use the Modified FLACC pain scale to assess the presence and level of pain in nonverbal patients. This tool was adapted from the FLACC pain scale by a nurse at our institution. The Modified FLACC pain scale tool ranks objective patient behaviors to determine a pain score; it has not been validated as a reliable tool. The Wong-Baker FACES scale has been validated as a reliable tool. This study is designed to evaluate these 2 pain scales. DESCRIPTION: This study began as a unit quality improvement project. The initial data collected was reviewed by the quality improvement project team and the preliminary results were significant for the study of pain assessment in this patient population. During early postoperative recovery, patients are unable to effectively communicate their pain to their caregivers. An application for an expedited convenience nursing research study was made to the institutional review board for human research. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:This is a prospective, observational, convenience study on 60 patients using the 2 pain scales. Pain assessment training is provided by the acute pain service nursing coordinator for all the clinician observers collecting data for the study. The Wong-Baker FACES scale, 0 to 10, is used by alert verbal patients to describe their pain level to one of the observers at a predetermined time. The other observer assesses and documents the patientÆs nonverbal behaviors and body language on the Modified FLACC tool during the same assessment period. All thoracic cardiovascular surgery patients in the ICU were included if they were alert and older than 18 years of age. Measures to prevent bias during the data collection include separate interactions with the patients by the observers. The results of the Modified FLACC will not provided to the second observer. The same patient will be assessed by 2 observers for the same time specified. This study has tremendous potential for clinical use and future research. There is no "approved pain assessment tool" for nonverbal patients at this time. This research will benefit from rigorous study oversight, increase the knowledge and improve the practice of pain assessment in non-verbal patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:17:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:17:50Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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